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Latest Paleoclimatology Stories

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2010-06-28 06:35:00

A chain of past natural events may hold lessons for the future Scientists still puzzle over how Earth emerged from its last ice age, an event that ushered in a warmer climate and the birth of human civilization. In the geological blink of an eye, ice sheets in the northern hemisphere began to collapse and warming spread quickly to the south. Most scientists say that the trigger, at least initially, was an orbital shift that caused more sunlight to fall across Earth's northern half. But how...

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2010-04-01 14:25:18

Trailing like a serpent's spine along the western coast of South America, the Andes are the world's longest continental mountain range and the highest range outside Asia, with an average elevation of 13,000 feet. The question of how quickly the mountains attained such heights has been a contentious one in geological circles, with some researchers claiming the central Andes rose abruptly to nearly their current height and others maintaining the uplift was a more gradual process. New research...

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2010-01-21 10:09:10

Ice Age climate records from an Arizona stalagmite link the Southwest's winter precipitation to temperatures in the North Atlantic, according to new research. The finding is the first to document that the abrupt changes in Ice Age climate known from Greenland also occurred in the southwestern U.S., said co-author Julia E. Cole of the University of Arizona in Tucson. "It's a new picture of the climate in the Southwest during the last Ice Age," said Cole, a UA professor of geosciences. "When it...

2009-12-08 18:08:30

The collision between the Siberian Plate and North China Plate was a significant geological event in earth history, which led to the final closure of the Paleoasian Ocean and the formation of the Eurasian continent. Despite numerous research efforts in recent decades, the precise time of this event has remained a puzzle until now. New evidence in helping settle this issue is provided by Prof. Deng Shenghui and his colleagues in their paper newly published in Science in China (2009, vol.52)....

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2009-12-06 08:20:00

Researchers say that a recent study has yielded "incontrovertible evidence" that a massive volcanic eruption on the Indonesian island of Sumatra some 73,000 years ago wrought massive destruction across much of what is now modern-day India, decimating vast swathes of ancient forests and pushing early human populations to the edge of extinction. Scientists at the University of Illinois say that their results powerfully corroborate one of the most controversial theories in the natural sciences...

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2009-11-23 15:05:07

A new study provides "incontrovertible evidence" that the volcanic super-eruption of Toba on the island of Sumatra about 73,000 years ago deforested much of central India, some 3,000 miles from the epicenter, researchers report. The volcano ejected an estimated 800 cubic kilometers of ash into the atmosphere, leaving a crater (now the world's largest volcanic lake) that is 100 kilometers long and 35 kilometers wide. Ash from the event has been found in India, the Indian Ocean, the Bay of...

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2009-11-22 07:00:00

Tons of private emails and papers supposedly sent between several of the world's top climate scientists in the last 13 years were stolen by hackers and posted online. The files were taken from the University of East Anglia's Climate Research Unit, a famous center that focuses on the investigation of natural and anthropogenic global warming. Climate change disbelievers who have sifted through the emails insist that they offer "smoking gun" proof that several of the climatologists agreed to...

2009-11-11 17:13:27

Geochemical analysis of rare ancient soil produces new paleoclimate data The Congo Basin "” with its massive, lush tropical rain forest "” was far different 150 million to 200 million years ago. At that time Africa and South America were part of the single continent Gondwana. The Congo Basin was arid, with a small amount of seasonal rainfall, and few bushes or trees populated the landscape, according to a new geochemical analysis of rare ancient soils. The geochemical analysis...

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2009-11-02 14:37:09

Researchers spent two months this summer high in the Peruvian Andes and brought back two cores, the longest ever drilled from ice fields in the tropics. Ohio State glaciologist Lonnie Thompson said that this latest expedition focused on a yet-to-be-named ice field 5,364 meters (17,598 feet) above sea level in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range. The researchers hiked to a col, or saddle, between two adjacent peaks "“ Hualcán and Copa "“ set up camp and used a ground sensing...

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2009-10-28 08:11:33

Fossil land snail shells found in ancient soils on the subtropical eastern Canary Islands show that the Spanish archipelago off the northwest coast of Africa has become progressively drier over the past 50,000 years. Isotopic measurements performed on fossil land snail shells resulted in oxygen isotope ratios that suggest the relative humidity on the islands was higher 50,000 years ago, then experienced a long-term decrease to the time of maximum global cooling and glaciation about 15,000 to...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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