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Latest Paleontology Stories

Sea Star Evolution
2012-07-26 14:08:55

How quickly can new species arise? In as little as 6,000 years, according to a study of Australian sea stars. "That's unbelievably fast compared to most organisms," said Rick Grosberg, professor of evolution and ecology at UC Davis and coauthor on the paper published July 18 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Grosberg is interested in how new species arise in the ocean. On land, groups of plants and animals can be physically isolated by mountains or rivers and then...

Eating Habits Of Dinosaurs Revealed
2012-07-17 04:53:29

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A great number of hypotheses have been suggested on feeding behavior of Diplodocus - thought to be one of the largest dinosaurs ever since its discovery over 130 years ago. These range between standard biting, combing leaves through peg-like teeth, ripping bark from trees similar to behavior in some living deer, and even grabbing shellfish from rocks. A team of international researchers, led by the University of Bristol and the...

Feathered Dinosaurs May Have Been The Norm
2012-07-03 09:47:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the most complete dinosaur fossils ever discovered suggests that feathered dinosaurs were more prevalent than previously thought and could have been the norm, not the exception. The 150 million-year-old fossil found in northern Bavaria shows that the dinosaur had down-like feathers over parts of its front and back as well on its tail. Scientists dubbed the creature Sciurumimus albersdoerferi after "Scirius”, the scientific...

Researchers Find Earliest Known Animal Life
2012-07-01 10:06:44

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online According to researchers, animals existed 585 million years ago – 30 million years earlier than previous records show. Proof of this was uncovered by University of Alberta (U of A) geologists Ernesto Pecoits and Natalie Aubet in Uruguay, where they found fossilized tracks a centimeter-long from a slug-like animal left behind 585 million years ago in silty, shallow-water residue. The team of investigators determined that...

Dinosaurs May Not Have Been Cold-Blooded After All
2012-06-28 10:13:58

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A new study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, suggests that dinosaurs were warm-blooded creatures, not cold-blooded reptiles as previously thought. According to BBC News Science and Technology Reporter Jason Palmer, researchers have disproven one of the primary bits of evidence supporting the four-decade-old theory that dinosaurs were cold blooded. That evidence, skeletal markings on the creatures' bones known as...

Mystery Of The Flatfish Head Solved
2012-06-25 16:50:25

Those delicious flatfishes, like halibut and sole, are also evolutionary puzzles. Their profoundly asymmetrical heads have one of the most unusual body plans among all backboned animals (vertebrates) but the evolution of their bizarre anatomy has long been a mystery. How did flatfishes, with both of their eyes on one side of their head, evolve? So puzzling was the anatomy of flounders and their kin that they were used in early arguments against Darwin and his theory of natural selection....

2012-06-21 11:10:35

Cutting Edge Technology and Hands-On Activities bring these Big, Bizarre, and Brand-New Dinos to Life Forget about the dinosaurs you know— prepare for a whole new breed of beast! On June 23, 2012, the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) launches the world premiere of Ultimate Dinosaurs: Giants from Gondwana, presented by Raymond James Ltd., one of North America´s leading full-service investment dealers. In this original exhibition curated, designed, and produced by the ROM, some of the...

New Technique Shaves Tons Off Dinosaur Weight
2012-06-06 07:31:40

Dinosaurs, some of the largest creatures to have ever walked the earth, have for the first time been accurately weighed by scientists using a new technique, and the results indicate that we have been guilty of wrongly portraying them as massively heavy beasts. Biologists at the University of Manchester, using lasers to calculate body mass, measured the minimum amount of skin that would be required to contain the skeletal structure of modern-day mammals, including reindeer, polar bears, and...

New Evidence Points To Asia As Source Of Earliest Anthropoid Primates
2012-06-04 14:15:15

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com The discovery of a new fossilized primate from Myanmar, Afrasia djijidae, illuminates a critical step in the evolution of early primates; according to a scientific paper describing the discovery that appears today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. An international research team located four teeth from the 37 million-year-old Afrasia in central Myanmar not far from their 2009 discovery of Ganlea megacania, another fossilized primate that...


Latest Paleontology Reference Libraries

Robert Thomas Bakker
2014-04-22 14:27:45

Robert Thomas Bakker (born March 24, 1945) is an American Paleontologist known for his contribution to the “Dinosaur Renaissance” and his support of his mentor Ostrom’s theory that some dinosaurs were warm-blooded. He specializes in the ecological context and behavior of dinosaurs. Bakker was born in Bergen County, New Jersey. As a young boy, he developed an interest in dinosaurs following his first trip to the dinosaur exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History – he was...

Northern Sun Star, Solaster endeca
2013-11-14 11:54:31

The northern sun star (Solaster endeca), also known as the purple sun star or the smooth sun star, is a species of starfish that is classified within the Solasteridae family. It can be found in the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean with a range that includes coastlines of Greenland, Canada, and the United States. It prefers a habitat in areas with adequate to heavy shelter and muddy or rocky sediment, at depths of up to 1,480 feet. The northern sun star is large, reaching a diameter of 7.9...

Morning Sun Star, Solaster dawsoni
2013-11-11 11:20:37

The morning sun star (Solaster dawsoni) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Solasteridae family. It can be found in northern areas of the Pacific Ocean with a range that extends from the coasts of China, Japan, and Siberia to the coasts of California in the United States. It prefers a habitat in rocky areas at depths of up to 1,380 feet. This species has two subspecies known as Solaster dawsoni dawsoni and Solaster dawsoni arcticus. It has a wide body with eight to thirteen...

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

John R. “Jack” Horner
2013-10-14 13:35:47

John R. “Jack” Horner (born June 15, 1946) is an American paleontologist known for his research on dinosaur growth, and for discovering evidence that some dinosaurs nested and cared for their young.  He is perhaps the most famous paleontologist due to his role as technical advisor for all three Jurassic Park films, and his providing inspiration for Dr. Alan Grant, the film's lead character. He also advised on the FOX television show Terra Nova. Horner was born and raised in the small...

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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