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Latest Paleontology Stories

End-Permian Crisis Recovery Took Earth 10 Million Years
2012-05-28 04:07:34

It took the Earth 10 million years to recover from a cataclysmic event that wiped out 90% of plant and animal life some 250 million years ago, according to new evidence presented Sunday in the journal Nature Geoscience. According to a press release detailing the research, Dr. Zhong-Qiang Chen of the China University of Geosciences in Wuhan and Professor Michael Benton from the University of Bristol discovered that biological recovery from what they dub "the greatest mass extinction of all...

Skull Of Jurassic Sea Creature Shows That Even Dinosaurs Had Arthritis
2012-05-16 10:28:45

Arthritis, an often debilitating joint disorder that affects millions and millions of people around the world, may have also caused pain and discomfort for dinosaurs and other ancient reptiles more than 150 million years ago, according to new research from the University of Bristol. Researchers, led by Bristol´s Dr. Judyth Sassoon, were fascinated to find a degenerative condition similar to arthritis in the jaw of a female pliosaur -- an ancient sea creature that lived during the Late...

2012-05-08 13:44:37

A basic tenet underpinning scientists' understanding of extinction is that more abundant species persist longer than their less abundant counterparts, but a new University of Georgia study reveals a much more complex relationship. A team of scientists analyzed more than 46,000 fossils from 52 sites and found that greater numbers did indeed help clam-like brachiopods survive the Ordovician extinction, which killed off approximately half of the Earth's life forms some 444 million years ago....

92819121
2012-05-05 07:24:36

An analysis of skeletal remains has provided new evidence that humans made it to the Western Hemisphere during the last ice age, where they lived alongside giant, now-extinct mammals, claims a new study published online Thursday in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. University of Florida researchers used rare earth element analysis in order to measure the concentration of naturally occurring metals absorbed during fossilization in human and mammal remains discovered in south Florida...

Rebel Coelacanth Discovery Forces Rethink On Their Evolution
2012-05-03 09:21:49

Canadian researchers have discovered a new species of Triassic coelacanth, a fish presumed extinct until a population was found off the coast of Africa in the 1930s, while digging through a trove of museum fossils, reports Jennifer Viegas for Discovery News. The coelacanth (pronounced SEE-la-kanth) is a primitive, slow-moving fish that is often referred to as a living fossil because it has existed largely unchanged for more than 300 million years. But the new discovery, dubbed Rebellatrix,...

Some Dinosaurs Were Already Dying Out Before Asteroid Impact
2012-05-02 04:49:27

Lawrence LeBlond for RedOrbit.com [ Watch the Video ] An asteroid impact may have ended the reign of the dinosaurs here on Earth about 65 million years ago, but new evidence suggests many of the large, plant-eating dinosaurs were already dying out during the last 12 million years of the Cretaceous period. The findings, by an international team of US and German scientists, do not dispute the mass extinction that killed off all the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous era. They do,...

First Fruitful, Then Futile: Ammonites Or The Boon And Bane Of Many Offspring
2012-04-23 08:48:13

For 300 million years, they were the ultimate survivors. They successfully negotiated three mass extinctions, only to die out eventually at the end of the Cretaceous along with the dinosaurs: Ammonoids, or ammonites as they are also known, were marine cephalopods believed to be related to today's squid and nautiloids. Ammonoids changed their reproductive strategy early on in the course of evolution. However, what was once a successful initial strategy may well have proved to be a fatal...

Cambrian Explosion Trigger Found In Grand Canyon
2012-04-20 04:50:27

Millions of years ago, the creatures who would become the ancestors of all life, animals and humans alike, were simple, sometimes composed of individual cells. Evolution had been slow, with very little diversification. Then, as the waters began to shift and separate exposing new areas of land to air and daylight, this slow evolution began to explode into activity. Referred to as the Cambrian Explosion, this diversification is estimated to have taken several million years itself, breeding many...

Image 1 - Dinosaurs May Have Doomed Their Species By Laying Eggs
2012-04-18 14:10:50

New research suggests that the way dinosaurs reproduced could have led to their demise. According to research from the Zoological Society of London, dinosaurs became at risk when they began to lay eggs. Working together with colleagues, Daryl Codron and Marcus Clauss from the University of Zurich conducted this research into the possible beginning stages of the dinosaurs extinction. Their work has been published in the journal Biology Letters. The trouble could have been the sheer size of...

Scientists Claim World's Largest Dinosaur Eggs Found In Chechnya
2012-04-18 04:50:08

Scientists from Chechnya said on Tuesday they have discovered what seem to be the largest fossilized dinosaur eggs ever recorded while combing a remote mountainous area of the North Caucasus region. Images of the large stash of dinosaur eggs were uploaded by the Chechen State University to its website following the exciting discovery, which occurred on April 9 during an expedition to study two waterfalls that had been previously uncharted. The remote site was shown after the images were...


Latest Paleontology Reference Libraries

Robert Thomas Bakker
2014-04-22 14:27:45

Robert Thomas Bakker (born March 24, 1945) is an American Paleontologist known for his contribution to the “Dinosaur Renaissance” and his support of his mentor Ostrom’s theory that some dinosaurs were warm-blooded. He specializes in the ecological context and behavior of dinosaurs. Bakker was born in Bergen County, New Jersey. As a young boy, he developed an interest in dinosaurs following his first trip to the dinosaur exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History – he was...

Northern Sun Star, Solaster endeca
2013-11-14 11:54:31

The northern sun star (Solaster endeca), also known as the purple sun star or the smooth sun star, is a species of starfish that is classified within the Solasteridae family. It can be found in the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean with a range that includes coastlines of Greenland, Canada, and the United States. It prefers a habitat in areas with adequate to heavy shelter and muddy or rocky sediment, at depths of up to 1,480 feet. The northern sun star is large, reaching a diameter of 7.9...

Morning Sun Star, Solaster dawsoni
2013-11-11 11:20:37

The morning sun star (Solaster dawsoni) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Solasteridae family. It can be found in northern areas of the Pacific Ocean with a range that extends from the coasts of China, Japan, and Siberia to the coasts of California in the United States. It prefers a habitat in rocky areas at depths of up to 1,380 feet. This species has two subspecies known as Solaster dawsoni dawsoni and Solaster dawsoni arcticus. It has a wide body with eight to thirteen...

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

John R. “Jack” Horner
2013-10-14 13:35:47

John R. “Jack” Horner (born June 15, 1946) is an American paleontologist known for his research on dinosaur growth, and for discovering evidence that some dinosaurs nested and cared for their young.  He is perhaps the most famous paleontologist due to his role as technical advisor for all three Jurassic Park films, and his providing inspiration for Dr. Alan Grant, the film's lead character. He also advised on the FOX television show Terra Nova. Horner was born and raised in the small...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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