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Latest Paleontology Stories

Were Dinosaurs Warm Blooded?
2013-07-19 10:55:04

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Modern reptiles are cold-blooded, and many researchers maintain dinosaurs were as well. New research from the University of Adelaide, however, suggests dinosaurs may have been warm-blooded like birds and mammals. Professor Roger Seymour of UA's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences argues cold-blooded dinosaurs would have been unable to develop the necessary muscle power to prey on other animals and dominate...

Fossilized Tooth In Dinosaur Tailbone Proves T. Rex Was A Predator
2013-07-16 07:23:38

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A recent discovery of a fossilized tooth from the Hell Creek Formation in Montana is bringing new evidence to the table Tyrannosaurus rex was indeed a hunter. The tooth was found embedded in the healed tailbones of a duckbill dinosaur, suggesting the animal survived a very close encounter with the tyrant lizard some 65 million years ago. The embedded tooth is the first concrete proof T. rex was not just a scavenger, but also a...

2013-07-12 12:48:32

Simon Fraser University biologists have discovered a new, extinct family of insects that will help scientists better understand how some animals responded to global climate change and the evolution of communities. The Eocene Apex of Panorpoid Family Diversity, a paper by SFU’s Bruce Archibald and Rolf Mathewes, plus David Greenwood from Brandon University, was recently published in the Journal of Paleontology. The researchers named the new family the Eorpidae, after...

How Plant Eating Dinosaurs Coexisted
2013-07-11 14:05:45

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study is helping answer a long-standing question about how large, plant-eating dinosaurs could have co-existed successfully over long periods of geological time. Dr. Jordan Mallon, a post-doctoral fellow at the Canadian Museum of Nature, measured and analyzed the characteristics of nearly 100 dinosaur skulls recovered from the Dinosaur Park Formation in Alberta. He published his results in the journal PLOS ONE. According to...

Starfish Have Primitive Eyes Used To Navigate Their Environment
2013-07-05 09:01:37

Society for Experimental Biology A study has shown for the first time that starfish use primitive eyes at the tip of their arms to visually navigate their environment. Research headed by Dr. Anders Garm at the Marine Biological Section of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, showed that starfish eyes are image-forming and could be an essential stage in eye evolution. The researchers removed starfish with and without eyes from their food rich habitat, the coral reef, and placed them...

2013-06-29 23:01:36

theFamilyTravelFiles has unveiled a new family vacation folder dubbed Dino Trips loaded with details about the best places in the U.S. and Canada to see old bones, dig for fossils, and learn more about pre historic times when dinosaurs, wooly mammoths, and saber tooth tigers populated the planet. Tampa, Florida (PRWEB) June 29, 2013 For more fun on your family vacation just add a dinosaur or maybe two and wait for the squeals, shouts, smiles and non-stop questions to begin. The new...

Paleontologists Observe Psittacosaurus Growth Through Fossil Studies
2013-06-28 14:25:17

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Paleontologists from around the globe have shown how the "parrot dinosaur" switched from four feet to two as it grew. Scientists from several universities wrote in the journal Nature Communications about how a Psittacosaurus would grow. These dinosaurs are one of the best-known dinosaurs, with more than 1,000 specimens found from the Cretaceous period in China and other parts of East Asia. The team sectioned two arm and two leg...

Unique Dinosaur Roamed The Desert Of Supercontinent Pangea
2013-06-25 09:03:28

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Pangaea, a single supercontinent existing from 300-200 million years ago, dominated the Earth during the Permian era with animal and plant life dispersed broadly across the land. This disbursement is documented by identical fossil species found on multiple modern continents. A new study, from the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, supports the idea that Pangaea had an isolated desert at the center of the supercontinent with unique...

2013-06-21 13:05:27

As past extinctions show, groups must continually adapt and evolve or they disappear The death of individual species is not the only concern for biologists worried about groups of animals, such as frogs or the "big cats," going extinct. University of California, Berkeley, researchers have found that lack of new emerging species also contributes to extinction. "Virtually no biologist thinks about the failure to originate as being a major factor in the long term causes of extinction,"...

Using Synchrotron X-rays To Put Flesh On The Bones Of Ancient Fish
2013-06-13 15:53:46

European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Swedish, Australian and French researchers present for the first time miraculously preserved musculature of 380 million year old armored fish discovered in north-west Australia. This research will help scientists to better understand how neck and abdominal muscles evolved during the transition from jawless to jawed vertebrates. The scientific paper describing the discovery is published today in the journal Science. The team of scientists who...


Latest Paleontology Reference Libraries

Robert Thomas Bakker
2014-04-22 14:27:45

Robert Thomas Bakker (born March 24, 1945) is an American Paleontologist known for his contribution to the “Dinosaur Renaissance” and his support of his mentor Ostrom’s theory that some dinosaurs were warm-blooded. He specializes in the ecological context and behavior of dinosaurs. Bakker was born in Bergen County, New Jersey. As a young boy, he developed an interest in dinosaurs following his first trip to the dinosaur exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History – he was...

Northern Sun Star, Solaster endeca
2013-11-14 11:54:31

The northern sun star (Solaster endeca), also known as the purple sun star or the smooth sun star, is a species of starfish that is classified within the Solasteridae family. It can be found in the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean with a range that includes coastlines of Greenland, Canada, and the United States. It prefers a habitat in areas with adequate to heavy shelter and muddy or rocky sediment, at depths of up to 1,480 feet. The northern sun star is large, reaching a diameter of 7.9...

Morning Sun Star, Solaster dawsoni
2013-11-11 11:20:37

The morning sun star (Solaster dawsoni) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Solasteridae family. It can be found in northern areas of the Pacific Ocean with a range that extends from the coasts of China, Japan, and Siberia to the coasts of California in the United States. It prefers a habitat in rocky areas at depths of up to 1,380 feet. This species has two subspecies known as Solaster dawsoni dawsoni and Solaster dawsoni arcticus. It has a wide body with eight to thirteen...

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

John R. “Jack” Horner
2013-10-14 13:35:47

John R. “Jack” Horner (born June 15, 1946) is an American paleontologist known for his research on dinosaur growth, and for discovering evidence that some dinosaurs nested and cared for their young.  He is perhaps the most famous paleontologist due to his role as technical advisor for all three Jurassic Park films, and his providing inspiration for Dr. Alan Grant, the film's lead character. He also advised on the FOX television show Terra Nova. Horner was born and raised in the small...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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