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Latest Palouse Stories

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2010-04-28 10:40:00

Scientists have discovered two living specimens of the giant Palouse earthworm near Spokane, Washington. One adult and one juvenile were found by University of Idaho soil science student Shan Xu and research support scientist Karl Umiker on March 27, according to a Tuesday press release posted at the university's website. Furthermore, they also discovered three Palouse cocoons, two of which have already hatched while under laboratory observation. According to Nicholas K. Geranios of the...

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2009-07-12 13:05:00

Scientists and researchers are scouring the Palouse region from eastern Washington into the Idaho panhandle in hopes of finding more of the dwindling giant Palouse earthworms, The Associated Press reported. The almost elusive worm is said to secrete a lily-like smell when handled, spit at predators, and live in burrows 15 feet deep. There have been only a handful of sightings. Even though there has been little research done on the Palouse worm, conservationists are asking the Obama...

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2009-07-01 12:05:00

Conservationists filed a petition with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday seeking federal protection for the Palouse earthworm "” a worm that spits at its predators, The Associated Press reported. Fans of the rare, sweet-smelling species requested the worm be protected as an endangered species. Noah Greenwald of the Center for Biological Diversity said the giant Palouse earthworm is critically endangered and needs the protection of the Endangered Species Act to have any...

2008-07-15 12:00:00

By Erica F. Curless, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. Jul. 15--North Idaho residents with questions about the controversial process of sorting out who owns what water rights are invited to a series of town hall meetings next week. The state Department of Water Resources will have seven meetings in Kootenai, Benewah and Shoshone counties, starting Monday in Wallace and wrapping up July 24 in Coeur d'Alene and Post Falls. "These meetings provide an opportunity for people to learn...

2008-07-08 00:00:13

By Mary Hopkin, Tri-City Herald, Kennewick, Wash. Jul. 7--Farmers in Franklin County can receive rental payments and other incentives for improving wildlife habitat on their lands. A portion of the Columbia Basin is one of four areas in Washington approved for a new wildlife initiative through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Conservation Reserve Program. The initiative, called State Acres for Wildlife Enhancement, or SAFE, aims to benefit wildlife and at-risk species associated...

2008-01-29 08:18:59

A rare 3-foot-long spitting earthworm that smells like lilies is at the heart of a legal battle between conservationists and the U.S. government. When taxonomist Frank Smith discovered the giant Palouse earthworm (Driloleirus americanus) in 1897 by, he described it as "very abundant." Nowadays, however, sightings of the worm are rare. The only recent confirmed worm sighting was made in 2005 by a University of Idaho researcher. Before that, the giant worm had not been spotted in...


Latest Palouse Reference Libraries

Columbia Plateau
2013-04-19 16:35:47

The Columbia Plateau ecoregion is a Level III ecoregion designed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington, with little areas over the Washington state border in Idaho. This ecoregion stretches across a wide swath of the Columbia River Basin from the Dalles, Oregon to Lewiston, Idaho to Okanogan, Washington near the Canadian border. It incorporates nearly 500 miles of the Columbia River, as well as the lower reaches of major tributaries....

Palouse
2013-04-02 16:32:59

The Palouse is a region of the northwestern United States, encompassing portions of southeastern Washington, north-central Idaho and, defined by some, extending south into northeast Oregon. It's a major agricultural area, predominantly producing wheat and legumes. Located about 160 miles north of the Oregon Trail, the region experienced rapid growth in the late 19th century, and at one time, the population of the Palouse exceeded even that of the Puget Sound area as the most populous region...

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