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Latest Papilloma Stories

2012-03-28 12:12:30

Women who are diagnosed with pre-cancerous cervical conditions after receiving the HPV vaccine can still benefit from a considerably reduced risk of reoccurring disease.

2012-03-15 22:05:56

Women ages 21 to 65 should have a Pap smear every three years, according to new guidelines from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

2012-03-02 01:09:51

Over the past few decades, doctors have noted a surprising trend in cancer of the tonsils and base of the tongue.

CDC Reports New Recommendation For Boys Getting HPV Vaccine
2012-02-06 05:57:31

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said in a recent report that it recommends all males between the ages 11 and 21 get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to protect against diseases and cancers.


Latest Papilloma Reference Libraries

0_d7e189bb6feb0f5663af7d072b6f51c6
2011-02-17 14:56:32

A human papillomavirus (HPV), a member of the papillomavirus family, is capable of infecting humans. HPVs establish productive infections in the skin or mucous membranes. Most of the 200 known types cause no symptoms in most people. Some types can cause warts, while others can lead to cancer. There are more than 30 to 40 types of HPV that are typically transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region. High risk HPV, can lead to cancer, in fact HPV infection is a cause of...

45_5c859467d327ea16fd80c3dd4b6c920b
2011-01-05 13:49:44

Bovine papillomavirus (BPV), of the Papillomaviridae family, is a group of DNA viruses common in cattle. The virus can cause warts of the skin and alimentary tract and in rare cases cancer. It is also though that equine sarcoid, a skin tumor, is brought on in horses and donkeys by BPV. BPV is a good model for the study of the papillomavirus molecular biology. Like others in their family BPVs are small non-enveloped viruses with an icosahedral capsid around 50-60 nm in diameter. BPVs have...

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Word of the Day
meacock
  • An uxorious, effeminate, or spiritless man.
  • A timorous, cowardly fellow.
Probably a blend of meek and cock, or from meek +‎ -ock (“diminutive suffix”).