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Latest Paralytic shellfish poisoning Stories

Robotic Sensor Tracks Toxic Red Tide
2013-05-08 09:53:09

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The way scientists monitor and manage red tides or harmful algal blooms (HABs) in New England may be transformed by a new robotic sensor deployed in the Gulf of Maine coastal waters by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). WHOI launched the new instrument at the end of last month and expects to deploy a second system later this spring. The robotic sensor will add critical data to weekly real-time forecasts of the New England...

Research Now Allows Fishermen To Harvest Lucrative Shellfish On Georges Bank
2013-04-11 09:51:25

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Combined research efforts by scientists involved in the Gulf of Maine Toxicity (GOMTOX) project, funded by NOAA´s Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) program, and administered by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), have led to enhanced understanding of toxic algal blooms on Georges Bank. This new information, coupled with an at-sea and dockside testing protocol developed through collaboration between GOMTOX...

2010-12-15 15:29:57

The quest to cure a terrible form of food poisoning caused by population explosions of algae that stain the water red and produce a potent toxin is the topic of a new episode in the American Chemical Society (ACS) Prized Science video series. Entitled "Taming the Red Tides," the high-definition video, released today, focuses on Michael Crimmins, Ph.D., winner of the 2010 Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Natural Products. Crimmins, a chemist at the University of North Carolina in...

2010-02-24 14:40:51

Seed population portends a large regional bloom; impacts will depend on ocean conditions and weather Today, scientists from the NOAA-funded Gulf of Maine Toxicity (GOMTOX) project issued an outlook for a significant regional bloom of a toxic alga that can cause 'red tides' in the spring and summer of this year, potentially threatening the New England shellfish industry. An abundant seed population in bottom sediments has set the stage for a significant bloom of the toxic alga Alexandrium...

2008-07-21 15:00:13

By KEVIN MILLER; OF THE NEWS STAFF State health officials are urging lobster eaters to avoid the greenish innards known as the tomalley because of risks of shellfish poisoning. Health officials for years have advised against eating the tomalley, the lobster liver some regard as a delicacy. The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention reiterated its advisory Friday, however, after some lobster livers tested positive for high levels of toxins caused by large blooms of red tide algae....

2008-07-19 00:00:11

By Kevin Miller, Bangor Daily News, Maine Jul. 18--State health and fisheries officials are urging lobster eaters to avoid the green, gooey innards known as the tomalley due to risks of shellfish poisoning. Health officials have for years advised against eating the tomalley, the lobster liver regarded as a delicacy by some. The Maine Center for Disease Control reiterated its advisory Friday, however, after some lobster livers tested positive for high levels of toxins caused by large...

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2006-10-16 15:30:00

A new observation and modeling program focused on the southern Gulf of Maine and adjacent New England shelf waters could aid policymakers in deciding whether or not to re-open, develop, and manage offshore shellfish beds with potential sustained harvesting value of more than $50 million per year. These areas are presently closed to the harvest of certain species of shellfish due to the presence of red tide toxins.    Researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution...

2006-08-24 07:42:38

OLYMPIA, Wash. - The worst red tide in perhaps a decade has shut down shellfish beds all along Puget Sound and prompted serious public health worries, state officials said Wednesday. Expanded beach closures have not reached the heart of Washington state's large farmed shellfish industry, and the state said commercial shellfish on the market have been tested and should be safe to eat. But industry officials worried that more bad news could further damage businesses already reeling from a...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.