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Latest Paranthropus Stories

1fdbb3e5f9cfe285fbb88877549354f51
2011-04-18 10:20:00

What was really on the menus of our ancestors? For human ancestors, eating could be hard work. "Our ancestors were large creatures. With very low quality foods, without cooked foods, it's very likely that they would have spent a great deal more of their day eating than we do," says Peter Ungar, distinguished professor and chairman of anthropology at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Ungar's work, understanding ancient diets, is a combination of anthropology, biology, engineering,...

019cc35d1b2d002c0b20d549b0d854901
2009-02-13 09:49:53

Dazzling new scientific techniques are allowing archaeologists to track the movements and menus of extinct hominids through the seasons and years as they ate their way across the African landscape, helping to illuminate the evolution of human diets. Piecing together relationships between the diets of hominids several million years ago to that of early and modern humans is allowing scientists to see how diet relates to the evolution of cognitive abilities, social structures, locomotion and...

2008-04-30 16:39:41

An early human with a big mouth made for chomping strangely preferred to eat soft, squishy fruits, new dental analyses suggest. The finding - the big guy's teeth showed only light wear - might force scientists to downgrade everything they thought they knew about hominids' diets. For starters, the findings could cause this hominid, Paranthropus boisei, to relinquish rights to its long-held moniker, the Nutcracker Man, in the eyes of anthropologists. The Nutcracker Man lived from...

7d8299e1b3c92454f6e6751faf37c6541
2008-04-30 11:00:00

Human ancestor's teeth yields new cluesTiny marks on the teeth of an ancient human ancestor known as the "Nutcracker Man" may upset current evolutionary understanding of early hominid diet.Using high-powered microscopes, researchers looked at rough geometric shapes on the teeth of several Nutcracker Man specimens and determined that their structure alone was not enough to predict diet.Peter Ungar, professor of anthropology at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, contends the finding...

0466b865905b8b5a351ba6a7d8711659
2007-08-01 03:00:00

By Simon Usborne It was 1974 and Dr Donald Johanson and his student, Tom Gray, were heading back to camp after a fruitless morning searching for fossils in the scorched ravines of Ethiopia's Afar Depression. Then something in the dust caught Gray's eye. It was part of an arm, immediately recognisable as hominid, or human-like. As the American paleoanthropologists looked further, they spotted fragments of a skull, thigh, ribs and jaw. Bone sightings in the Awash valley, one of the world's...

95d719dd538f9200a7116b952c61b0151
2005-08-08 17:10:00

Using a powerful microscope and computer software, a team of scientists from Johns Hopkins, the University of Arkansas, Worcester Polytechnic Institute and elsewhere has developed a faster and more objective way to examine the surfaces of fossilized teeth, a practice used to figure out the diets of our early ancestors. By comparing teeth from two species of early humans, Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus, the researchers confirm previous evidence that A. africanus ate more...

2005-08-04 17:37:01

A Penn State researcher is part of the team that developed techniques that have generated insights into dietary divergences between some of our human ancestors, allowing scientists to better understand the evolutionary path that led to the modern-day diets that humans consume. "Our new techniques are allowing us to get beyond simple dichotomies and helping us understand the processes by which dietary evolution is working," said Peter Ungar, professor of anthropology at the University of...


Latest Paranthropus Reference Libraries

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

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Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.