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Latest Parasites Stories

Stem Cells In A Human Parasite Revealed Through Study
2013-02-26 09:31:26

University of Illinois From the point of view of its ultimate (human) host, the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni has a gruesome way of life. It hatches in feces-tainted water, grows into a larva in the body of a snail and then burrows through human skin to take up residence in the veins. Once there, it grows into an adult, mates and, if it´s female, starts laying eggs. It can remain in the body for decades. A new study offers insight into the cellular operations that give...

2013-02-19 11:32:24

New research has revealed that immature malaria parasites are more resistant to treatment with key antimalarial drugs than older parasites, a finding that could lead to more effective treatments for a disease that kills one person every minute and is developing resistance to drugs at an alarming rate. University of Melbourne researchers have shown for the first time that malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum)in the early stages of development are more than 100 times less sensitive to...

2013-02-01 09:46:19

Fight against river blindness is successful and inexpensive A relatively inexpensive program set up to combat river blindness, an infectious disease, has resulted in major health improvements in Africa, shows a study conducted by Erasmus University Medical Center researchers. The study, due to be published January 31 in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, shows that US$250 million helped cure or prevent blindness, skin disease, severe itching, and other symptoms in millions of people. In...

2012-12-12 12:11:36

New research, presented this morning at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), has identified important associations between Plasmodium falciparum  (Pf) malaria and endemic Burkitt Lymphoma (eBL) that may help researchers identify young children who are more susceptible to eBL. Unlike previous studies in which malaria infection alone was considered the important factor, this study approached the evolving complexity and heterogeneity of the humoral immune...

'Regular Hexagonal Pattern' Found In A Plant-parasitic Nematode Worm
2012-12-07 18:57:35

Pensoft Publishers A new plant-parasitic nematode worm (Meloidoderita salina) was found in a tidal salt marsh at Mont Saint Michel Bay (MSMB) in France, where its abbey is a world-famous historical heritage. The species name 'salina' refers to salty soil and is derived from the Latin word 'sal' or 'salis' meaning 'salt'. The study was published in the peer-reviewed, open source scientific journal ZooKeys. The female nematode worm of Meloidoderita salina deposits its eggs in two...


Latest Parasites Reference Libraries

Nematology
2013-09-30 13:49:26

Nematology is the study of nematodes, also known as roundworms, which first began in the nineteenth century. Like many fields of study, nematology began with ancient recordings and descriptions lacked elements of modern science. The oldest record of a nematode occurs in the Pentateuch in the fourth book of Moses known as Numbers. The reference, although not plainly stating roundworms or nematodes, is thought to refer to Dracunculus medinensis, a species that is native to the area near the Red...

Pork Tapeworm, Taenia solium
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The pork tapeworm (Taenia solium), also known simply as a tapeworm, is a species of parasitic worm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. This species infects pigs and humans in many areas of the world including Africa, Southern Europe, Asia, South America, and some areas of North America. This species can cause cysticercosis in its larval stage, which is one of the major causes of seizures in humans. The pork tapeworm can reach an average body length between 2 to 3 meters, but...

Paragonimus westermani
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paragonimus westermani is a species of fluke, or flatworm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. This species is abundant in South America and Asia and affects the lungs of humans and other hosts. It was first discovered in 1878 in Europe after two Bengal tigers died. In 1879, Ringer found this species in the lungs of a human. Manson and Erwin von Baelz identified the sputum and eggs separately in 1880, after which Manson asserted that a snail was most likely the worm's...

Lancet Liver Fluke, Dicrocoelium dendriticum
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The lancet liver fluke (Dicrocoelium dendriticum) is a parasitic worm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. It is thought to be native to over thirty countries including Switzerland, Spain, Germany, Iran, China, Vietnam, Japan, Ghana, and Nigeria, among many other areas. It is also found in South and North America and in Australia. It is typically found in cattle or other grazing species, so it is thought to prefer a habitat that supports these species. It is similar in...

Chinese Liver Fluke, Clonorchis sinensis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Chinese liver fluke (Clonorchis sinensis) is a species of parasitic worm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. It can be found in Southeast Asia, Taiwan, Japan, and China and is present in nearly 30,000,000 humans today. It is thought to be one of the world’s most pervading parasites. The Chinese liver fluke requires two intermediate, or secondary, hosts and one definitive, or main, host to successfully complete its lifecycle. The first intermediate host is typically...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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