Quantcast

Latest Parasitism Stories

2011-09-09 13:07:29

Important implications for global pest-control The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is one of the world's most destructive crop pests. It has developed resistance to many chemical and biological pesticides, and the estimated global cost of controlling this insect is approximately US$1billion annually. In a new article published in the open access journal BMC Genomics, researchers from Australia have identified the genes expressed when the diamondback moth is attacked by a...

2011-09-01 11:58:38

An investigation into the mysterious inner workings of the malaria parasite has revealed that it survives and proliferates in the human bloodstream thanks in part to a single, crucial chemical that the parasite produces internally. According to scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and Stanford Medical School, reporting today in the journal PLoS Biology, this insight immediately provides a powerful new tool for discovering and designing drugs to treat malaria,...

17ee163d88cf4442178cfe0f65a6da1a
2011-08-19 15:56:23

When a male rat senses the presence of a fetching female rat, a certain region of his brain lights up with neural activity, in anticipation of romance. Now Stanford University researchers have discovered that in male rats infected with the parasite Toxoplasma, the same region responds just as strongly to the odor of cat urine. Is it time to dim the lights and cue the Rachmaninoff for some cross-species canoodling? "Well, we see activity in the pathway that normally controls how male...

2011-08-18 14:41:32

A press release from PLoS ONE New research shows how a brain parasite can manipulate rodent fear responses for the parasite's own benefit. The study, authored by Patrick House and Dr. Robert Sapolsky of Stanford University and released this week in PloS One, addressed how the single-celled parasite Toxoplasma gondii makes infected rodents more likely to spend time near cat odors. The study finds Toxoplasma-infected male rats have altered activation in brain regions involved in fear and...

2011-08-16 13:32:00

BEL AIR, Md., Aug. 16, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Lyme disease and heartworm are endemic to the Upper Midwest, which is where the nonprofit Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) is headed for its fourth annual Parasite Education Road Show, July 20 - August 3. (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110816/CG53219) During stops in 13 cities - Omaha, Neb.; Des Moines; Minneapolis; Chicago; Madison, Wis.; Milwaukee; Grand Rapids, Mich.; Lansing, Mich.; Toledo; Pittsburgh; Columbus,...

2011-08-15 22:21:01

A recent study suggests that parasites in fish, including threatened species of Oregon coho salmon, may have more profound impacts on fish health than has been assumed, and could be one of the key mechanisms by which habitat and land use changes cause salmon mortality. It's not just the presence or absence of parasites that is important, the research found, but their numbers that can build up over years or decades and ultimately cause major impacts. The study will be published soon in the...

2011-08-05 14:05:09

A new study has revealed in unprecedented detail how parasites use different nutrients needed for growth, providing University of Melbourne researchers with unique drug targets against Leishmania, a tropical parasite that infects 12 million people worldwide and causes 500,000 deaths annually. A team led by Professor Malcolm McConville from the Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne developed a new analytical method which can be used for many infectious parasites and bacteria. The technique...

5cec8c42029d4332f77728133a7cfd4d
2011-07-22 11:55:58

Research leads to new "scaling" rule for abundance and production of animals Animal species all follow the same rule for how common they are in an ecosystem, scientists have discovered. And the rule is simple. Everything from birds to fishes, crabs to snails to worms, and the parasitic animals that live inside or on them, follows it. "You can predict how common something might be just by knowing its body weight--how big an individual is--and how high up the food chain it is," says biologist...

30325dd14b05a41019fd497d09049b75
2011-07-08 12:05:00

According to researchers, sex gives worms the power to fight off parasites. The researchers found that worms forced to reproduce asexually succumbed to a bacterial infection and died. The team said the results are the most convincing evidence to date for a key theory in evolutionary biology. The theory said that sex evolved because it allows organisms to reshuffle their genes into new combinations to stay a step ahead of parasites. The team said that reproducing asexually means there is no...

2011-07-07 20:35:00

It seems we may have parasites to thank for the existence of sex as we know it. Indiana University biologists have found that, although sexual reproduction between two individuals is costly from an evolutionary perspective, it is favored over self-fertilization in the presence of coevolving parasites. Sex allows parents to produce offspring that are more resistant to the parasites, while self-fertilization dooms populations to extinction at the hands of their biological enemies. The July 8...


Latest Parasitism Reference Libraries

Lancet Liver Fluke, Dicrocoelium dendriticum
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The lancet liver fluke (Dicrocoelium dendriticum) is a parasitic worm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. It is thought to be native to over thirty countries including Switzerland, Spain, Germany, Iran, China, Vietnam, Japan, Ghana, and Nigeria, among many other areas. It is also found in South and North America and in Australia. It is typically found in cattle or other grazing species, so it is thought to prefer a habitat that supports these species. It is similar in...

Profilicollis
2014-01-05 00:00:00

Profilicollis is a genus of acanthocephalan parasites that are found in crustaceans and shorebirds. Profilicollis parasites use decapod crustaceans as intermediate hosts and species of shorebirds as definitive hosts. The parasite first develops in mole crabs of North and South America. After it infects a mole crab, it becomes dormant until the crab is eaten by a suitable bird, such as a Surf scoter or Herring Gull. Once the parasite has passed through the stomach of the bird, it develops...

Moniliformis moniliformis
2014-01-05 00:00:00

Moniliformis moniliformis is a species of acanthocephalan parasite that can infect humans, though it rarely does. Human infections have been reported in the United States, Iran, Iraq, and Nigeria. It has been found in rats all over the world, and usually is found in cats, dogs and, in Poland, red foxes. Intermediate hosts are usually beetles and cockroaches. This parasite, like other acanthocephalans, does not have a digestive tract. It absorbs nutrients through the tegument (external...

Giant Thorny-headed Worm, Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus
2014-01-05 00:00:00

The Giant Thorny-headed Worm (Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus) is a species of acanthocephalan parasite found in the intestines of pigs and other hoofed animals, and can occasionally appear in humans and dogs. The eggs of this parasite are usually found in scarabaeoid or hydrophilid beetles and other similar insects. Worms of this species range in size from less than four-hundredths of an inch to over 15 inches. It causes enteritis, gastritis or peritonitis in affected hosts. While it...

More Articles (4 articles) »
Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
Related