Quantcast

Latest Parasitology Stories

3a80c972bfa2fa034bda84ccb8c9563c1
2011-04-14 09:50:35

New research reveals how biological arms races between cuckoos and host birds can escalate into a competition between the host evolving new, unique egg patterns (or 'signatures') and the parasite new forgeries. Brood parasitic birds such as cuckoos lay eggs that mimic those of their hosts in an effort to trick them into accepting the alien egg and raising the cuckoo chick as one of their own. New research from the University of Cambridge has found that different bird species parasitized by...

2586304a806556d91f75e3b7d076e91d
2011-04-02 06:40:00

An international team of scientists published new research this week on the origins of flies and, and despite popular belief, the common ancestry house flies have with mosquitoes. Researchers, publishing a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, said the mosquito branched off the same evolutionary tree as the house fly about 220 million years ago, while the house fly branched off about 170 million years later. While only a few species of flies are commonly...

2011-02-25 19:16:47

NIH-funded study finds way to reduce transmission of malaria to humans Spraying malaria-transmitting mosquitoes with a genetically modified fungus can kill the malaria parasite without harming the mosquito, potentially reducing malaria transmission to humans, according to a new study published in the journal Science. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, the study was led by Raymond J. St. Leger, Ph.D., of the...

2011-02-10 19:43:01

Research published in Genetics proposes a system for spreading disease-resisting genes in mosquito populations Scientists have modeled a system that may be used to control mosquitoes and the diseases they transmit, without the use of pesticides. In the proposed system, mosquitoes are engineered to carry two genes. The first gene causes males to transmit a toxin to females through their semen. The second gene, when expressed in females, makes them immune to this toxin. This research, published...

2011-01-03 21:08:44

Same Proteins Involved, but Cancer Takes Hold When Response Gets Out of Control, CCNY Biologists Report Tiny parasitoid wasps can play an important role in controlling the populations of other insect species by laying their eggs inside the larvae of these species.  A newly hatched wasp gradually eats the host alive and takes over its body.  The host insect is far from defenseless, however.  In Drosophila (fruit flies), larvae activate humoral immunity in the fat body and mount...

2010-12-13 13:48:43

Research presented at American Society of Cell Biology's 50th annual meeting in Philadelphia The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and the pathogenic bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis exemplify convergent evolution, the development of a similar biological trait in unrelated lineages, according to research presented today at the American Society of Cell Biology's 50th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. The biological trait shared by the two pathogens is their modus operandi "“ how they...

097a22c054b696a0d500facc626365f21
2010-09-29 09:37:10

Study finds higher temperatures, precipitation levels mean greater harm by parasites to developing chicks A Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) study on nesting birds in Argentina finds that increasing temperatures and rainfall"”both side effects of climate change in some parts of the world"”could be bad for birds of South America, but great for some of their parasites which thrive in warmer and wetter conditions. The study, which looked at nesting forest birds in Santa Fe,...

2010-08-19 15:50:00

BEL AIR, Md., Aug. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Originally written May 20, 2010 -- For the third year in a row, the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) is hitting the road with its Parasite Education Road Show Tour, which is designed to educate veterinarians, staff members and pet owners on the importance of year-round parasite control in dogs and cats. This year's tour will focus on the southeastern United States with veterinary meetings and pet owner events scheduled in 15 cities over 17...

4b76e2967bfeeedcce70ce3096959cb9
2010-08-02 13:35:00

A Taiwanese woman has won a $3,000 prize by catching roughly 4 million mosquitoes in just one month. Imbictus International, a company that makes insect traps, said that Huang Yu-yen, from southern Taiwan's Yunlin county, beat 72 rivals with a catch weighing in at just 3 pounds and 5 ounces. Her collection of mosquitoes doubled that of her nearest rival. The company sent an application to Guinness World Records asking that Huang be recognized as the world's number one killer of mosquitoes....

2010-07-16 14:14:46

In the battle between insect predators and their prey, chemical signals called kairomones serve as an early-warning system. Pervasively emitted by the predators, the compounds are detected by their prey, and can even trigger adaptations, such a change in body size or armor, that help protect the prey. But as widespread as kairomones are in the insect world, their chemical identity has remained largely unknown. New research by Rockefeller University's Joel E. Cohen and colleagues at the...


Latest Parasitology Reference Libraries

Pork Tapeworm, Taenia solium
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The pork tapeworm (Taenia solium), also known simply as a tapeworm, is a species of parasitic worm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. This species infects pigs and humans in many areas of the world including Africa, Southern Europe, Asia, South America, and some areas of North America. This species can cause cysticercosis in its larval stage, which is one of the major causes of seizures in humans. The pork tapeworm can reach an average body length between 2 to 3 meters, but...

Paragonimus westermani
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paragonimus westermani is a species of fluke, or flatworm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. This species is abundant in South America and Asia and affects the lungs of humans and other hosts. It was first discovered in 1878 in Europe after two Bengal tigers died. In 1879, Ringer found this species in the lungs of a human. Manson and Erwin von Baelz identified the sputum and eggs separately in 1880, after which Manson asserted that a snail was most likely the worm's...

Echinococcus multilocularis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Echinococcus multilocularis is a species of tapeworm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. It is one of a few worms that cause echinococcosis, a disease that affects many canid species including wolves, coyotes, foxes, jackals, domesticated dogs. Humans can also contract this disease. Adult members of this species can reach an average length of .2 inches, and like other species of tapeworm, its body is segmented by three proglottids. Its head, or scolex, is equipped with...

Trichinella spiralis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Trichinella spiralis, sometimes known as the pork worm, is a parasite within the Nematoda class. It can be found in pigs, rats, humans, and bears. This worm causes trichinosis in humans, most often from consuming undercooked pork. This species is the smallest within its class, reaching an average body length of .16 centimeters. Females are twice as large as males, displaying a sexual dimorphism. The reproductive organs of females are unique to the species in that the front end holds developed...

Guinea Worm, Dracunculus medinensis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis) is a species of roundworm with the Nematoda phylum. This species is once ranged throughout Asia and Africa, including the west coasts of Africa in Guinea. Although it is not present in this range anymore, the species retains its common name. It was identified in this area by Carl Linnaeus, who discovered the parasite in many merchants along the coast. Its scientific name was also given due to a large population in one area, called Medina. Dracunculus...

More Articles (12 articles) »
Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
Related