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Latest Parkfield, California Stories

Why Some Quakes Shake Faster Revealed By Tabletop Fault Model
2012-10-31 15:28:04

University of California - Berkeley The more time it takes for an earthquake fault to heal, the faster the shake it will produce when it finally ruptures, according to a new study by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, who conducted their work using a tabletop model of a quake fault. "The high frequency waves of an earthquake – the kind that produces the rapid jolts – are not well understood because they are more difficult to measure and more difficult to...

Caltech Researchers Gain Greater Insight Into Earthquake Cycles
2012-05-11 08:08:27

New dynamic computer model first to show full history of a fault segment For those who study earthquakes, one major challenge has been trying to understand all the physics of a fault–both during an earthquake and at times of "rest"–in order to know more about how a particular region may behave in the future. Now, researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have developed the first computer model of an earthquake-producing fault segment that reproduces, in a...

earthquake
2011-08-29 08:23:39

  Scientists hope findings bring them closer to earthquake forecasting "What do I remember about an earthquake? I was in the 7th grade. All of a sudden the floor just started shaking. Desks were falling over. Kids were falling on the ground. It was so scary. It happened so quickly!" For people like Tony Zurnick, part of growing up in California was getting caught off guard by the sudden rumbles of earthquakes. Anyone who has lived through a major earthquake will tell you they'd...

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2009-12-23 14:50:00

Link to earthquakes unclear, but tremors seem to increase stress on shallower fracture zone The faint tug of the sun and moon on the San Andreas Fault stimulates tremors deep underground, suggesting that the rock 15 miles below is lubricated with highly pressurized water that allows the rock to slip with little effort, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley, seismologists. "Tremors seem to be extremely sensitive to minute stress changes," said Roland Brgmann, UC...

2009-11-23 09:43:37

Using a technique normally used for detecting weak tremors, scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that the 2004 magnitude 6 earthquake along the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault exhibited almost 11 times more aftershocks than previously thought.  The research appears online in Nature Geoscience and will appear in print in a forthcoming edition. "We found almost 11 times more events in the first three days after the main event. That's surprising because...

2009-10-05 12:46:11

U.S. scientists studying the giant 2004 earthquake that caused Indian Ocean tsunamis say they've determined the quake weakened part of the San Andreas Fault. The seismologists said their findings suggest the Earth's largest earthquakes can weaken fault zones worldwide and might trigger periods of increased global seismic activity. An unusually high number of magnitude 8 earthquakes occurred worldwide in 2005 and 2006, said Rice University Associate Professor Fenglin Niu, one of the study's...

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2009-10-01 06:35:00

Researchers at the Carnegie Institution say that they have discovered a method of measuring and monitoring geological fault lines beneath the Earth's crust"”a development that could significantly enhance scientists' ability to accurately predict earthquakes. Geologists previously had no means with which to detect and measure the fluctuating strength of faults that are hidden beneath the Earth's surface.  Now, however, researchers from the Carnegie Institution's Department of...

2009-07-10 09:49:26

Tremors deep within the San Andreas Fault suggest California should not become complacent about future earthquakes, a leading seismologist said. The San Andreas fault is changing down deep and it's changing down deep in places where large earthquakes have happened in the past, said Robert Nadeau, a research seismologist at the University of California, Berkeley. Seismic activity in the central part of the fault has increased in the years since the magnitude 6.5 San Simeon quake in 2003 and...

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2009-07-10 06:25:00

A spike in mysterious underground rumblings observed on a section of the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California, could indicate a build-up of stress and an increased likelihood of a major earthquake, said scientists at the University of California, Berkeley. The researchers monitored seismic activity along a heavily instrumented segment of the central San Andreas Fault from July 2001 to February 2009, and recorded more than 2,000 tremors lasting from minutes to nearly half an hour....


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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