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Latest PARP inhibitor Stories

Gene Increases Risk Of Developing breast Cancer To One In Three By Age 70
2014-08-08 03:08:44

University of Cambridge Breast cancer risks for one of potentially the most important genes associated with breast cancer after the BRCA1/2 genes are today reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. Women with mutations in the PALB2 gene have on average a one in three chance of developing breast cancer by the age of seventy. In a study run through the international PALB2 Interest Group a team of researchers from 17 centers in eight countries led by the University of Cambridge...

2014-06-03 12:27:34

Institute of Cancer Research Around a quarter of smokers who carry a defect in the BRCA2 gene will develop lung cancer at some point in their lifetime, a large-scale, international study reveals. Scientists announce a previously unknown link between lung cancer and a particular BRCA2 defect, occurring in around 2 per cent of the population, in research published in Nature Genetics today (Sunday). The defect in BRCA2 - best known for its role in breast cancer - increases the risk of...

2014-04-07 12:33:35

The Most Promising Emerging Agents in Development for Triple Negative Breast Cancer Target Only Specific Patient Subsets, According to Findings from Decision Resources Group BURLINGTON, Mass., April 7, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Decision Resources Group finds that due to the heterogeneity of triple negative breast cancer the most promising emerging agents in development, target only specific subsets of patients. The two novel emerging therapies niraparib (Tesaro) and Xtandi (Medivation/Astellas)...

2014-04-04 12:23:54

These genes could explain why some women with high-risk mutations suffer from cancer while others do not Today we know that women carrying BCRA1 and BCRA2 gene mutations have a 43% to 88% risk of developing from breast cancer before the age of 70. Taking critical decisions such as opting for preventive surgery when the risk bracket is so wide is not easy. Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) researchers are conducting a study that will contribute towards giving every woman far...

2014-02-14 12:23:35

The Jeffrey Epstein VI Foundation backs the FDA's landmark decision to approve inhibitor cocktails for melanoma. NEW YORK, Feb. 14, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The well-known science philanthropist and founder of the Program for Evolutionary Dynamics at Harvard University, has heralded the Food and Drug Administration's approval of the first inhibitor combination clinical trial for melanoma patients. "It's about time," Jeffrey Epstein remarked who donated substantial funds to the...

2014-01-21 10:24:45

For first time, PARP-1 enzyme, Sidekick-1 gene implicated in enhancing brain reward system Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified a new molecular mechanism by which cocaine alters the brain's reward circuits and causes addiction. Published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Dr. Eric J. Nestler, MD, PhD, and colleagues, the preclinical research reveals how an abundant enzyme and synaptic gene affect a key reward...

2013-06-18 19:23:17

CNIO researchers take part in an international project that describes the molecular bases of resistance to a new chemotherapeutic agent in familial breast and ovarian cancers It is estimated that between 5% and 10% of breast and ovarian cancers are familial in origin, which is to say that these tumors are attributable to inherited mutations from the parents in genes such as BRCA1 or BRCA2. In patients with these mutations, PARP inhibitors, which are currently in clinical trials, have shown...

2013-06-06 23:03:05

A novel gene variant found in human and animal tissue may be a promising treatment for cancer, including breast and brain cancer, according to scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. New York, NY (PRWEB) June 06, 2013 A novel gene variant found in human and animal tissue may be a promising treatment for cancer, including breast and brain cancer, according to scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. The variant, called PTEN-long, may contribute to a...

2013-05-15 10:32:53

A novel drug may help increase the effectiveness of radiation therapy for the most deadly form of brain cancer, report scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center. In mouse models of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the new drug helped significantly extend survival when used in combination with radiation therapy. Recently published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, the study provides the first preclinical evidence demonstrating that an ATM kinase...

2013-02-04 10:19:38

Double-strand breaks in DNA happen every time a cell divides and replicates. Depending on the type of cell, that can be pretty often. Many proteins are involved in everyday DNA repair, but if they are mutated, the repair system breaks down and cancer can occur. Cells have two complicated ways to repair these breaks, which can affect the stability of the entire genome. Roger A. Greenberg, M.D., Ph.D., associate investigator, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute and associate professor...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.