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New Mechanism Of Drug Resistance Discovered By Scientists

New Mechanism Of Drug Resistance Discovered By Scientists

Marla Vacek Broadfoot, Duke University Microorganisms like bacteria and fungi can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs. These permanent mutations were once thought to be the only way...

Latest Pathogenic fungi Stories

2014-05-14 08:29:43

NORTHBROOK, Ill., May 14, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Astellas reported today that the efficacy and safety data of the isavuconazole invasive aspergillosis study (SECURE) were presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Barcelona, Spain. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140416/84970 Previously announced topline data showed that the randomized, double-blind SECURE study met the primary objective of demonstrating non-inferiority of...

2013-10-22 23:25:18

Xtalks presents an exciting live webinar on Thursday October 31, 2013 at 1:00 pm EDT which will describe the use of natural products as starting points for the development of new anti-fungal agents. Toronto, Canada (PRWEB) October 22, 2013 Inhibition of b-1,3-glucan synthesis is the mechanism of action of the echinocandin class of natural products and has been shown to result in clinically effective therapy for important fungal pathogens including azole resistant Candida spp. and invasive...

2012-07-25 09:43:12

The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans inconspicuously lives in our bodies until it senses that we are weak, when it quickly adapts to go on the offensive. The fungus, known for causing yeast and other minor infections, also causes a sometimes-fatal infection known as candidemia in immunocompromised patients. An in vivo study, published in mBio, demonstrates how C. albicans can distinguish between a healthy and an unhealthy host and alter its physiology to attack. “The...

2012-04-11 22:32:18

More than 600 million people could be fed each year by halting the spread of fungal diseases in the world's five most important crops, according to research published today in the journal Nature. Furthermore, data reviewed by scientists suggests that in 70% of cases where infectious disease causes the extinction of a type of animal or plant, an emerging species of fungus is behind the problem. Evidence suggests this figure is increasing. The scientists behind the study, from the...

2012-04-04 10:16:53

In a research article published April 3 in the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology, Prof. Sylvia Cremer and colleagues at the Institute of Science and Technology, Austria show how micro-infections promote social vaccination in ant societies. Like crowded megacities, ant colonies face a high risk of disease outbreaks. These are kept in check by the ants' social immune system–a set of collective hygienic behaviours and adaptive changes in interaction frequencies that acts in...

2012-03-17 00:00:51

Additional study identifies 224 new genetic interactors for key protein in Candida albicans Scientists at the University of Toronto have found a molecular mechanism that plays a key role in the transition of Candida albicans yeast into disease-causing fungus–one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infection. The finding highlights the importance of heat in fungal growth, and provides a new target for drug therapies to counter Candida albicans infection. Candida albicans is...

2011-09-09 11:35:57

Researchers at the University of Toronto have developed a therapy for a potentially deadly type of infection common in catheters, artificial joints and other "in-dwelling" medical devices. Their findings appear in the Open Access Journal PLoS Pathogens on September 8th. The therapy targets fungal infections, which are hard to treat in such devices because they are composed of biofilms–complex groupings of cells that attach to surfaces. Biofilms, in turn, are coated in a gooey matrix...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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