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Latest Pathogenomics Stories

2013-04-10 13:27:21

Researchers have been able to reconstruct the genome sequence of an outbreak strain of Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) using metagenomics (the direct sequencing of DNA extracted from microbiologically complex samples), according to a study in the April 10 issue of JAMA, a Genomics theme issue. The findings highlight the potential of this approach to identify and characterize bacterial pathogens directly from clinical specimens without laboratory culture. "The outbreak of...

History Is Key Factor In Plant Disease Virulence
2012-04-20 03:30:50

Where disease-causing microbes have been makes a difference The virulence of plant-borne diseases depends on not just the particular strain of a pathogen, but on where the pathogen has been before landing in its host, according to new research results. Scientists from the University of California System and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (USDA ARS) published the results April 18 in the journal PLoS ONE. The study demonstrates that the pattern of...

2012-01-30 14:13:40

Escherichia coli bacteria thrive in the lower intestine of humans and other animals, including birds. Most are vital constituents of the healthy gut flora, but certain forms of E. coli cause a range of diseases in both humans and poultry. In this month´s issue of the journal PLoS ONE, a team of researchers at Arizona State University´s Biodesign Institute investigates disease-causing E. coli strains known as APEC (for Avian Pathogenic E. coli).  By studying circular segments...

2011-06-04 11:51:00

SHENZHEN, China, June 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- To aid the fight of the deadly outbreak of E. coli O104 strain in Europe, BGI-Shenzhen and their collaborators at the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf have released an updated draft genome assembly result built upon the sequencing data previously released and submitted to NCBI in the previous two days. As one of the first genomes assembled using the latest ion semiconductor sequencing technology, there were some initial difficulties...

2010-09-17 08:56:00

PITTSBURGH, Sept. 17 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Researchers from the Center for Genomic Sciences at Allegheny General Hospital (AGH) in Pittsburgh have made a landmark discovery about the evolutionary nature of bacteria in the setting of chronic infectious disease. Reporting today in the journal PLos Pathogens, the AGH team documents for the first time that bacteria engage in a process called horizontal gene transfer to evolve rapidly during the course of a single infection. The result is...

2010-03-04 11:19:47

The thousands of bacteria, fungi and other microbes that live in our gut are essential contributors to our good health. They break down toxins, manufacture some vitamins and essential amino acids, and form a barrier against invaders. A study published today in Nature shows that, at 3.3 million, microbial genes in our gut outnumber previous estimates for the whole of the human body. Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, working within the...

2009-12-18 13:15:17

Large-scale genomic sequencing of microbes and ecosystems recommended for greatest impact in medicine, manufacturing Scientists can gain insights into new ways to use microorganisms in medicine and manufacturing through a coordinated large-scale effort to sequence the genomes of not just individual microorganisms but entire ecosystems, according to a new report from the American Academy of Microbiology that outlines recommendations for this massive effort. The report, "Large-Scale Sequencing:...

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2005-09-22 15:20:00

Rockville, MD -- Ever since the genomics revolution took off, scientists have been busily deciphering vast numbers of genomes. Cataloging. Analyzing. Comparing. Public databases hold 239 complete bacterial genomes alone. But scientists at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) have come to a startling conclusion. Armed with the powerful tools of comparative genomics and mathematics, TIGR scientists have concluded that researchers might never fully describe some bacteria and...