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arctic permafrost
2014-08-25 03:00:15

Bernie DeGroat, University of Michigan Just how much Arctic permafrost will thaw in the future and how fast heat-trapping carbon dioxide will be released from those warming soils is a topic of lively debate among climate scientists. To answer those questions, scientists need to understand the mechanisms that control the conversion of organic soil carbon into carbon dioxide gas. Until now, researchers believed that bacteria were largely responsible. But in a study published in Science...

Arctic Lakes Soak Up More Greenhouse Gases Than They Emit: Study
2014-07-18 03:19:15

University of Alaska Fairbanks New University of Alaska Fairbanks research indicates that arctic thermokarst lakes stabilize climate change by storing more greenhouse gases than they emit into the atmosphere. Countering a widely-held view that thawing permafrost accelerates atmospheric warming, a study published this week in the scientific journal Nature suggests arctic thermokarst lakes are 'net climate coolers' when observed over longer, millennial, time scales. "Until now, we've...

Siberia Yamal Peninsula
2014-07-17 10:01:06

Joshua Garrett for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online What could cause an 80 meter hole to form somewhere in northern Siberia? A meteorite strike? Aliens? Cthulhu? Researchers all over the world are scratching their heads over this one, as no one seems to have an answer they are 100 percent sure of. Reported by the Siberian Times, this giant hole of unknown depth appeared rather suddenly in the Yamal Peninsula, which is said to translate as “end of the world,” giving the whole...

Twelvemile Lake permafrost
2014-06-11 06:47:04

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most studies on Arctic permafrost are harbingers of doom. As the sea ice melts, the permafrost is being affected, and releasing large amounts of greenhouse gases such as carbon and methane. These gases will accelerate the process of global warming, creating a vicious cycle. A new study from the US Geological Survey and McGill University, published in Geophysical Research Letters, has revealed a surprise in permafrost research....

Buried Fossil Soils Found To Be Rich In Carbon
2014-05-26 03:40:43

By Terry Devitt, University of Wisconsin-Madison Soils that formed on the Earth’s surface thousands of years ago and that are now deeply buried features of vanished landscapes have been found to be rich in carbon, adding a new dimension to our planet’s carbon cycle. The finding, reported today (May 25, 2014) in the journal Nature Geoscience, is significant as it suggests that deep soils can contain long-buried stocks of organic carbon which could, through erosion, agriculture,...

Permafrost Thawing Could Accelerate Global Warming
2014-04-08 15:41:51

Kathleen Haughney, Florida State University A team of researchers lead by Florida State University have found new evidence that permafrost thawing is releasing large quantities of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere via plants, which could accelerate warming trends. The research is featured in the newest edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “We’ve known for a while now that permafrost is thawing,” said Suzanne Hodgkins, the lead author on the paper...

2014-03-06 12:22:12

DAVIS, Calif., March 6, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- "Soil health is a journey to understand how to mimic nature," says Ray 'the-Soil-Guy' Archuleta, a conservationist and soil health instructor with the USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Farmers and anyone who wants to understand how to build more naturally fertile soil that also absorbs rainfall while requiring fewer inputs to produce a profitable crop, are invited to attend any of the four free seminars. The...

Study Shows Rock Can Turn Into Soil Faster Than Previously Thought
2014-01-17 11:09:55

University of Washington Geologic time is shorthand for slow-paced. But new measurements from steep mountaintops in New Zealand show that rock can transform into soil more than twice as fast as previously believed possible. The findings were published Jan. 16 in the early online edition of Science. "Some previous work had argued that there were limits to soil production," said first author Isaac Larsen, who did the work as part of his doctoral research in Earth sciences at the...

2013-10-30 10:39:33

The high cliffs of Eastern Siberia – which mainly consist of permafrost – continue to erode at an ever quickening pace. This is the conclusion which scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research have reached after their evaluation of data and aerial photographs of the coastal regions for the last 40 years. According to the researchers, the reasons for this increasing erosion are rising summer temperatures in the Russian permafrost regions as...

Evidence Shows Dust And Sand Deposits In China Are Controlled By Rivers
2013-10-15 06:56:34

Royal Holloway, University of London New research published today in the journal Quaternary Science Reviews has found the first evidence that large rivers control desert sands and dust in Northern China. Northern China holds some of the world's most significant wind-blown dust deposits, known as loess. The origin of this loess-forming dust and its relationship to sand has previously been the subject of considerable debate. The team of researchers led by Royal Holloway University,...


Latest Pedology Reference Libraries

Wetland
2013-04-19 18:19:23

A wetland is an area of land that is saturated with water, either permanently or seasonally, such that it takes on the traits of a distinct ecosystem. First and foremost, the factor that distinguishes the wetlands from other land forms or water bodies is the unique vegetation that has adapted to its characteristic soil conditions. The wetland consists mostly of hydric soil, which is supportive of aquatic plants. The water that is found in wetlands can be saltwater, brackish, or freshwater....

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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