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Latest Permaculture Stories

2008-10-03 18:00:15

By Booker T Leigh When the leaves start to fall, most homeowners are ready to forget about plant disease and insects until next summer. Normally, fall is the best time to start controlling next year's diseases and insects. A little work now can prevent a lot of problems next year. Here are some things to do to help control disease and insect problems for next year: Rake up and destroy leaves of all fruit trees and small fruits. Also, remove any rotten or dried-up fruit still hanging...

2008-09-29 09:00:28

By CONNIENELSON Clean up Continue to harvest vegetables as they ripen. If you have more veggies than you can use, take them to a food shelf. (To find a food shelf near you, call Second Harvest at 651-484-5117 or go www.2harvest.org.) Once they're hit by a hard frost, remove annuals and vegetables and toss them in the compost bin. Cut back perennials that show signs of disease. Don't compost diseased plant material. Throw it in the trash. Leave sturdy-stemmed perennials and those...

2008-09-27 00:00:18

A Mushroom compost manufacturer has been ordered to take action to reduce the smell produced by the process. Cotswold District Council is taking action against Agricultural Supply Company Limited, of Fairford. It has served enforcement notices on the firm after completing an investigation following a number of odour complaints from neighbours of the Sunhill site. Residents have long campaigned about smells. More than 20 protesters against the firm's plan to process mixed organic waste...

2008-09-14 12:00:15

By NATE DOWNEY As we roll out along the high-altitude, arid terrain of the non- riparian areas in this enchanting land, we mostly find dry dirt. When compared to the entirety of our state's nearly sterile surface area, almost any measure of "healthy soil" would be an insignificant figure. Still, I'm always surprised, after a good rain, how much life pops out of dormancy. Typically, only a thin coating of windblown dust covers New Mexico's hard, deep layers of concretized calcium carbonate...

2008-09-05 21:00:12

By Dale Skaggs Now that the rains have moistened the soil, one good gardening task is to prepare soil for fall planting. In the Mid-South most of our soil is slightly acidic clay. If you have topsoil you probably live in an older house. In general, good building soil is vastly different from good gardening soil, and if there was any topsoil originally on the site the developers removed the good garden stuff. I often hear from folks who are new to the area complain that the soil here is...

2008-09-04 21:00:19

By BAY AREA NEWS GROUP -- Use a flat planting surface. Mounds, raised rows cause inefficient use of water due to rapid drying. A raised area once dried is difficult to wet again. A raised area causes the water to run away from the root zone and is wasted. -- Mulch. Use of a drip system on a mulched garden reduces water need by about 50 percent. -- Plant closer rows. Weed. Weeds rob moisture from the garden. -- Group plants by similar watering requirements. Squash, zucchini and...

2008-08-27 03:00:35

By Anonymous A project to evaluate the effects of green waste compost and "in vessel" compost (with food waste included) on the yield and quality of Class 1 fruit in commercial strawberry production was presented to visitors at Fruit Focus. The Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP)-funded trial is taking place at East Mailing Research (EMR) - and scientists Dr Mark Else of EMR and Dr Martin Wood of Earthcare Environmental were on hand to discuss the progress of the project so far....

2008-08-17 18:00:23

By Booker T Leigh Trees are an important part of your landscape. However, given our weather, keeping them alive is sometimes hard to do. Water is very important for their survival and growth. Drought conditions can lead to tree decline, pest problems and diseases. A mature tree can lose gallons of water a day through its leaves. When the water lost though the leaves is not replaced, trees will become stressed. Water stress shows up as dropping, wilting, yellow or brown leaves. Some...

2008-08-03 09:00:11

Q. You recently had a question on Moses in the cradle. Since I have grown that plant for nearly 20 years, I've found that it is winter-hardy in my Virginia Beach yard. A clump of them in each corner of my tropical garden in full sun comes back every year. They are much prettier when grown outside - a deeper, richer purple than when grown indoors. The more sun they get, the deeper their color. Another reason for their name Moses in the cradle is that the little boat-shaped bracts are lined...

2008-07-27 09:00:23

By JAMES PRICHARD By James Prichard The Associated Press GRAND HAVEN, Mich. WHEN NATURE CALLS, campers at Michigan's Grand Haven State Park can now go "green" at a new, environmentally friendly toilet-shower building that is the first of its kind in the state park system. Construction on a similar facility at Otsego Lake State Park near Gaylord is scheduled to begin this fall. Officials hope to eventually replace all the rest-rooms at Michigan's 97 state parks and recreation areas...


Latest Permaculture Reference Libraries

Sheet Mulching
2013-08-05 12:36:35

Sheet mulching, or lasagna gardening, is the process of turning barren ground into a more nourishing garden without digging. It is a layered system that can be used for a yard garden or a topical box garden. Starting at the bottom is a weed proof barrier, like newspaper or cardboard. On top of that is a twelve-inch layer of compost or mulch material such as old clothes, yard clippings, and manure, which provides for nutrient rich soil. Weed-free soil is added prior to planting the desired...

Forest Gardening
2013-07-31 15:46:47

Forest gardening is a woodland ecosystem that requires little maintenance. Forest gardening is a form of intercropping that is a seven tier, layering system utilizing the space from the sub-ground up to the canopy in order to provide high yielding food production for human consumption in wooded areas. Layering utilizes the photosynthesis to the maximum benefit for each tier within the forest garden. The canopy level consists of the tallest fruit/nut trees with dwarf trees in the...

Three Sisters
2013-05-18 07:30:48

Three Sisters crop is a technique of gardening used primarily by Native Americans, but gardeners of any kind may also use this technique. These crops use three types of plants; in the Tewa tribe, they use four. The traditional seeds used are corn, beans, and squash. There are many benefits from this method, the first being the use of the corn stalks for the beans to grow on. The beans themselves then provide nitrogen for the corn and squash, while giving the corn amino acids, lysine, and...

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Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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