Quantcast

Latest Permafrost Stories

975aeb71825fc60c5fa8c9c11aaae8b21
2009-07-09 13:19:41

Scientists have determined that the oldest viable seeds in the world, dating from the Pleistocene era, are not as old as experts once believed, BBC News reported. The seeds, which have been grown into live Arctic lupine plants, are not 10,000 years old as believed, according to new dating techniques. In fact, using the new methods, scientists have concluded they are actually modern seeds that contaminated ancient rodent burrows. However, the scientist who debunked the record said it remains...

2009-06-30 14:16:45

The vast amount of carbon stored in the arctic and boreal regions of the world is more than double that previously estimated, according to a study published this week.The amount of carbon in frozen soils, sediments and river deltas (permafrost) raises new concerns over the role of the northern regions as future sources of greenhouse gases."We now estimate the deposits contain over 1.5 trillion tons of frozen carbon, about twice as much carbon as contained in the atmosphere", said Dr. Charles...

2009-06-17 09:50:00

Two University of the Alaska Fairbanks researchers are among key contributors to a new national report that details visible effects of climate change in the United States and how today's choices stand to affect the future.The report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States," is the first to focus on observed and projected climate change and its effects specifically in the United States. UAF scientists A. David McGuire and John Walsh were part of a consortium of experts from 13...

2009-06-02 11:20:01

As frozen arctic soil thaws due to climate change, U.S. scientists say bacteria will break down large amounts of carbon, sending it into the atmosphere. Although plants will initially proliferate, nurtured by balmier conditions and an increasing abundance of the greenhouse gas they depend on for growth, University of Florida researchers said they don't expect plant growth will be able to blunt the carbon release. At first, with the plants offsetting the carbon dioxide, it will appear...

8374e4eeed9b8f967d581758e1c6ac4f1
2009-05-29 09:30:00

Retrieve longest Arctic sediment record under Siberia's Lake El'gygytgyn A team of scientists from the United States, Germany, Russia and Austria has just returned from a six-month drilling expedition to a frozen lake in Siberia: Lake El'gygytgyn, "Lake E" for short. Lake E was created 3.6 million years ago when a meteor more than a half-mile wide hit Earth and formed an 11-mile wide crater. There, the researchers collected the longest sediment core samples retrieved in the Arctic region....

d718c1bd517709a8f694fcca2617ca961
2009-05-27 15:45:00

"A slow-motion time bomb." That's what one ecologist calls the looming threat of trapped greenhouse gases in the melting Arctic. Ted Schuur, an ecologist from the University of Florida, says the impact of thawing Arctic soil would allow bacteria to slowly break down organic matter and release carbon into the atmosphere, further exacerbating global warming. However, plants will also began to grow more as a result of thawing, which causes researchers to question how much these shrubs will be...

42ad04b68d2a7b3c6a44df53db9bf5731
2009-05-06 14:30:04

Global warming could result in massive droughts and flooding in Tibet, posing threats to the wellbeing of millions of people, according to the head of the China Meteorological Bureau. According to China's Xinhua news agency, Zheng Guoguang reported on Wednesday that climate change has "accelerated glacial shrinkage, and the melting glaciers have swollen Tibet's lakes." "If the warming continues, millions of people in western China will face floods in the short term and drought in the long...

90d35987986a11811c53359d9e85325a1
2009-04-15 14:24:50

U.S. government scientists say their research indicates the effects of significant global warming on Earth can no longer be avoided. But the researchers said a worldwide reduction in greenhouse gas emissions would reduce the effects, lessening sea-level rise and possibly saving Arctic Sea ice. The study, led by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, determined that if all nations cut emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases by 70 percent this century, the most...

2008-11-25 11:35:01

University of Toronto-Scarborough researchers say looking at the ground, not the sky, could better determine where climate change could be the worst. Global warming, the scientists reported in Nature Geoscience, changes the molecular structure of organic matter in the soil, the university said in a news release. Soil contains more than twice the amount of carbon than does the atmosphere, yet, until now, scientists haven't examined this significant carbon pool closely, said Myrna Simpson,...

234cf378dbcc64882e4c5069320d234f
2008-11-03 11:18:09

Finding could influence global climate change predictions, policy The fight against climate warming has an unexpected ally in mushrooms growing in dry spruce forests covering Alaska, Canada, Scandinavia and other northern regions, a new UC Irvine study finds. When soil in these forests is warmed, fungi that feed on dead plant material dry out and produce significantly less climate-warming carbon dioxide than fungi in cooler, wetter soil. This came as a surprise to scientists, who expected...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
Related