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Latest Permian–Triassic extinction event Stories

Image 1 - New Technique Unlocks Secrets Of Ancient Ocean
2011-10-11 11:53:04

ASU researchers develop new method to learn about Earth's largest mass extinction event Earth's largest mass extinction event, the end-Permian mass extinction, occurred some 252 million years ago. An estimated 90 percent of Earth's marine life was eradicated. To better understand the cause of this "mother of all mass extinctions," researchers from Arizona State University and the University of Cincinnati used a new geochemical technique. The team measured uranium isotopes in ancient...

2011-10-10 09:23:41

Results contradict several theories for cause of extinction While the cause of the mass extinction that occurred between the Permian and Triassic periods is still uncertain, two University of Rhode Island researchers collected data that show that terrestrial biodiversity recovered much faster than previously thought, potentially contradicting several theories for the cause of the extinction. David Fastovsky, URI professor of geosciences, and graduate student David Tarailo found that...

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2011-08-08 09:07:48

By Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley The demise of the world's forests some 250 million years ago likely was accelerated by aggressive tree-killing fungi triggered by global climate change, according to a new study by a University of California, Berkeley, scientist and her Dutch and British colleagues. The researchers do not rule out the possibility that today's changing climate could cause a similar increase in pathogenic soil bacteria that could devastate forests already stressed by a warming...

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2011-07-22 06:20:00

The release of a huge amount of methane gas may have caused a massive, prehistoric extinction that gave way to the arrival of dinosaurs as the dominant life form on earth, according to a new study. Micha Ruhl and his team of researchers from the Nordic Center for Earth Evolution at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark suggest that the mass extinction of half of Earth's marine life over 200 million years ago was a result of a huge release of carbon methane into the atmosphere, which led to...

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2011-05-20 12:37:24

A fossil unearthed in China in the 1970s of a creature that died about 247 million years ago, originally thought to be a distant relative of both birds and crocodiles, turns out to have come from the crocodile family tree after it had already split from the bird family tree, according to research led by a University of Washington paleontologist.The only known specimen of Xilousuchus sapingensis has been reexamined and is now classified as an archosaur. Archosaurs, characterized by skulls with...

2011-05-05 22:04:01

The end-Permian extinction, by far the most dramatic biological crisis to affect life on Earth, may not have been as catastrophic for some creatures as previously thought, according to a new study led by the University of Bristol. An international team of researchers studied the parareptiles, a diverse group of bizarre-looking terrestrial vertebrates which varied in shape and size.  Some were small, slender, agile and lizard-like creatures, while others attained the size of rhinos; many...

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2011-01-24 06:30:00

After a volcanic eruption that occurred around 250 million years ago, hundreds of millions of years before dinosaurs were wiped off the face of the planet, almost 95 percent of all primitive life living in the ocean and 70 percent of all animals evolving on land were wiped out. Researchers at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada have discovered evidence suggesting that massive volcanic eruptions at the time burnt significant levels of coal, producing suffocating clouds of ash and...

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2010-12-22 09:25:00

A massive new fossil site discovered in southwestern China marks the first discovery of a complete ecosystem which recovered following a mass extinction. According to Guardian Science Correspondent Ian Sample, "the spectacular haul of 20,000 fossils," which was discovered at a hillside in what it now Luoping county in the Yunnan Province of China, were "beautifully preserved" and included "mollusks, sea urchins and arthropods, alongside much larger animals that occupied the top of the food...

2010-10-28 15:15:13

More than 251 million years ago, at the end of the Permian period, Earth almost became a lifeless planet. Around 90 percent of all living species disappeared then, in what scientists have called "The Great Dying." Thomas J. Algeo, has spent much of the past decade investigating the chemical evidence buried in rocks formed during this major extinction. The University of Cincinnati professor of geology has worked with a team of scientific colleagues to understand the ancient catastrophe. Algeo...

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2010-03-29 06:34:14

The rise in human emissions of carbon dioxide is driving fundamental and dangerous changes in the chemistry and ecosystems of the world's oceans, international marine scientists warned today. "Ocean conditions are already more extreme than those experienced by marine organisms and ecosystems for millions of years," the researchers say in the latest issue of the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution (TREE). "This emphasizes the urgent need to adopt policies that drastically reduce CO2...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'