Quantcast

Latest Permian–Triassic extinction event Stories

140896d1b72f7a64a861762dcc4685a11
2010-01-15 10:45:12

Scientists have discovered that air flows in one direction as it loops through the lungs of alligators, just as it does in birds. The results, published in this week's issue of the journal Science, suggest that this breathing method may have helped dinosaurs' ancestors dominate Earth after the planet's worst mass extinction 251 million years ago. Before and until about 20 million years after the extinction--called "the Great Dying" or the Permian-Triassic extinction--mammal-like reptiles...

2009-11-20 14:30:23

Environmental selectivity during three of the "ËœBig Five' mass extinction events focus of two paleontologists' latest research. Arnie Miller, University of Cincinnati professor of paleontology in the McMicken College of Arts & Sciences, and co-author Michael Foote of the University of Chicago publish their research in the Nov. 20 issue of Science with their paper, "Epicontinental Seas Versus Open-Ocean Settings: The Kinetics of Mass Extinction and Origination." For many years,...

c28dbca8b119fd920884b2e348fecb25
2009-10-02 13:11:47

Tiny organisms that covered the planet more than 250 million years ago appear to be a species of ancient fungus that thrived in dead wood, according to new research published October 1 in the journal Geology. The researchers behind the study, from Imperial College London and other universities in the UK, USA and The Netherlands, believe that the organisms were able to thrive during this period because the world's forests had been wiped out. This would explain how the organisms, which are...

5fcc0b703044653ef3712e914754be871
2009-05-29 06:45:00

According to a new study, volcanic eruptions in what is now present-day China may have been the cause of mass extinction 260 million years ago. The Guadalupian Mass Extinction, which devastated marine life around the world, was preceded by eruptions in the Emeishan province of Southwest China, said Paul Wignall, paleontologist from the University of Leeds. According to the report, which appears in Friday's edition of the journal Science, the eruption in China unleashed nearly a half million...

4cccb962202bb24e1de329e4714b98bd
2008-10-07 10:34:46

Evidence suggests that 'sick Earth' extinctions more likely In geology as in cancer research, the silver bullet theory always gets the headlines and nearly always turns out to be wrong. For geologists who study mass extinctions, the silver bullet is a giant asteroid plunging to earth. But an asteroid is the prime suspect only in the most recent of five mass extinctions, said USC earth scientist David Bottjer. The cataclysm 65 million years ago wiped out the dinosaurs. "The other four have not...

2008-09-19 03:00:23

By Radley, Jonathan Twitchett, Richard J; Mander, Luke; Cope, John Journal, Vol. 165, 2008, pp. 319-332 Jonathan Radley writes: The Penarth Group (of Late Triassic and possibly ranging to Early Jurassic age) of the southern UK marks a marine transgression and the establishment of a shallow epicontinental seaway (Hallam & El Shaarawy 1982; Warrington & Ivimey-Cook 1992), influenced by regressive-transgressive pulses and characterized by rapid facies changes (Hallam & Wignall...

831387324df0ceb840598e552d471f6b1
2008-08-31 10:00:00

By Robert S. Boyd / McClatchy Newspapers It was the greatest mass murder of all time - poison everywhere, billions slain - but the killers have never been positively identified. An estimated 95 percent of marine species and 85 percent of land creatures died, said Peter Ward, a paleobiologist at the University of Washington in Seattle. Scientists call it "The Great Dying." Life took millions of years to recover. Scientific sleuths now think they're making progress toward learning what...

1f04afea6b51337257a5a0944b7b1b901
2008-01-21 10:15:00

The full recovery of ecological systems, following the most devastating extinction event of all time, took at least 30 million years, according to new research from the University of Bristol. About 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian, a major extinction event killed over 90 per cent of life on earth, including insects, plants, marine animals, amphibians, and reptiles. Ecosystems were destroyed worldwide, communities were restructured and organisms were left struggling to...

e9c573b8c28a5b3e6402e556bc8279ce1
2008-01-18 10:12:40

The full recovery of ecological systems, following the most devastating extinction event of all time, took at least 30 million years, according to new research from the University of Bristol. About 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian, a major extinction event killed over 90 per cent of life on earth, including insects, plants, marine animals, amphibians, and reptiles. Ecosystems were destroyed worldwide, communities were restructured and organisms were left struggling to recover....

975f0671e71e808e59f850a5bc0e7fc5
2008-01-07 15:45:00

We all know the story - dinosaurs were supposedly wiped out by an asteroid over 65million years ago. However, it is now being suggested that it could have been disease-spreading mosquitoes and other biting insects that lead to their demise. Husband and wife team George and Roberta Poinar from Oregon State University suggest that disease spread by mosquitoes, mites and ticks was probably the major factor that finished off the reptiles. By changing the nature of plant life, these insects could...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'