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Latest Permian–Triassic extinction event Stories

ce8689afa2d8392441c0658cf52fde1f1
2007-10-31 08:35:00

The Great Dying 250 million years ago happened slowly, according to USC geologists USC -- The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history also may have been one of the slowest, according to a study that casts further doubt on the extinction-by-meteor theory. Creeping environmental stress fueled by volcanic eruptions and global warming was the likely cause of the Great Dying 250 million years ago, said USC doctoral student Catherine Powers. Writing in the November issue of the journal...

1d4ce3cc50781c8548f4bb248ec0352f1
2007-05-30 03:00:00

By Whitty, Julia WE AWAKE IN OUR TENTS in the moonlight to what sounds like a dance troupe in wooden clogs practicing on rock under stunted juniper trees. It's a half-dozen Carmen mountain white-tailed deer, scraping at the ground with bootlike hooves, bending gracile necks to chew on wet soil and lick it dry. They're harvesting the minerals and moisture from our urine soaked into the parched earth of the high desert, the herd toiling through the night and into the morning in a pursuit...

feda68989c2fd30328edee4c2b3a55e51
2006-11-27 09:45:00

The earth experienced its biggest mass extinction about 250 million years ago, an event that wiped out an estimated 95% of marine species and 70% of land species. New research shows that this mass extinction did more than eliminate species: it fundamentally changed the basic ecology of the world's oceans. Ecologically simple marine communities were largely displaced by complex communities. Furthermore, this apparently abrupt shift set a new pattern that has continued ever since. It reflects...

5507b1d3891d80882e021459c172b389
2005-12-02 12:38:32

The world's largest mass extinction was probably caused by poisonous volcanic gas, according to research published today. The research, published in the journal Geology, reveals vital clues about the mass extinction at the end of the Permian period, 250 million years ago, when mammal-like reptiles known as synapsids roamed the earth. Many scientists had previously thought that an asteroid hitting the earth or a deep-sea methane release had caused the extinction, which obliterated more than...

2005-08-10 00:35:00

British researchers have hit on a clever way to search for ancient ozone holes and their relationship to mass extinctions: measure the remains of ultraviolet-B absorbing pigments ancient plants left in their fossilized spores and pollen. To develop the approach, researcher Barry Lomax and his colleagues at the University of Sheffield and other leading UK institutions analyzed spores held in the British Antarctic Survey's collection from South Georgia Island, a UK territory in the far...

932a11fe32afa92ba1d76329f097d0d41
2005-06-16 09:40:00

Blacksburg, Va. - A study of fossils from the Paleozoic Era, collected across the world, reveals that ancient brachiopods were little bothered by predators. However, the rare predation traces left on brachiopod shells by unknown assailants coupled with a subtle increase in their frequency through time may be the shadows on the wall that show killers were in the room and their numbers increased with time. From 550 million years ago until 250 million years ago, brachiopods, or "lampshells,"...

3d14176742247da76dae3216a56ffc6e1
2005-05-09 07:20:00

Scientists can recite a long list of the devastating environmental consequences of a large meteorite impact, but they cannot prove these effects have led to the simultaneous loss of life around the globe. Answering the question of how and why such a large variety of species died out at the same time is one of the greatest mysteries in paleontology. Astrobiology Magazine -- At least 50 percent of the world's species, including the dinosaurs, perished 65 million years ago. A large meteorite...

9d67e082b817885288d50e5d3ed9a7a31
2005-01-20 15:41:17

WASHINGTON (AP) -- An ancient version of global warming may have been to blame for the greatest mass extinction in Earth's history. In an event known as the "Great Dying," some 250 million years ago, 90 percent of all marine life and nearly three-quarters of land-based plants and animals went extinct. Scientists have long debated the cause of this calamity - which occurred before the era of dinosaurs - with possibilities including such disasters as meteor impacts. Researchers led by Peter...

e812a1441b3f4d99a554a22e04149e9c
2004-12-01 08:31:27

The devastating cycles of plant and animal extinctions have spawned different schools of thought: Did the earth or the heavens bring catastropher? Astrobiology Magazine -- Two hundred and fifty million years ago, ninety percent of marine species disappeared and life on land suffered greatly during the world's largest mass extinction. The cause of this great dying has baffled scientists for decades, and recent speculations invoke asteroid impacts as a kill mechanism. Yet a new study published...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.