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Latest Pertussis Stories

Better Vaccines Through Designer Bacteria
2013-01-16 04:49:54

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Scientists from the University of Texas-Austin (UTA) recently revealed that they have been able to develop 61 new strains of genetically engineered bacteria that could boost the effectiveness of vaccines for diseases such as cholera, HPV, the flu, and pertussis. The findings on these strains of E. coli were featured in a recent edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. These strains of E. coli are part of a...

Whooping Cough Vaccines Proven Safe For Adults
2012-11-29 17:03:29

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online According to research published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, immunizing adults with tetanus-diphtheria-acellular-pertussis (Tdap) vaccine to prevent whooping cough is as safe as immunizing them with the tetanus and diphtheria (Td) vaccine. The researchers of the study looked at electronic health records of nearly 120,000 people ages 65 and older at seven U.S. health systems between January 1, 2006 and...

2012-11-29 12:55:34

A new study of the safety of the tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine supports the recommendation that those 65 and older get the vaccine to protect themselves and others, particularly young babies, from pertussis. Published online in Clinical Infectious Diseases, the findings come as reported U.S. cases of the bacterial infection, also known as whopping cough, are at the highest level since the 1950s. An extremely contagious respiratory illness, pertussis puts...

2012-11-28 13:10:05

In an examination of cases of childhood pertussis in California, researchers found that children with pertussis had lower odds of having received all 5 doses of the diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) vaccine series; however the odds increased as the time since last DTaP dose lengthened, which is consistent with a progressive decrease in estimated vaccine effectiveness each year after the final dose of DTaP vaccine, according to a study in the November 28 issue of...

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2012-09-13 17:47:22

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online In the early years of life, children are given immunization shots against all types of potential dangerous illness, including whooping cough, or acellular pertussis. According to a new study, however, children older than 6 and even some teenagers could benefit from an extra round of booster shots. “We found that the effectiveness of the vaccine wanes 42% on average each year during the five years after the fifth dose,"...


Latest Pertussis Reference Libraries

72_b75cb7e7f27495ea349e72b80532a220
2011-04-14 15:37:44

Bordetella pertussis is a Gram-negative, aerobic coccobacillus of the genus Bordetella. It is the causative agent of pertussis or whooping cough and it is non-motile. There is no zoonotic reservoir thus humans are the only hosts. Bacterium is spread by coughing and by nasal dripping after an incubation period of 7 to 14 days. Pertussis is an infection of the respiratory system and characterized by a "whooping" sound when the person breathes in. Before the vaccine was developed there were...

72_631c513bc8b131448026972e513d9aba
2011-04-14 15:28:20

Bordetella bronchiseptica is a small, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium of the genus Bordetella. It can cause bronchitis although it rarely infects humans. It is closely related to pertussis which causes whooping cough and B. bronchiseptica can persist in the environment for extended periods. Humans are not natural carriers of B. bronchiseptica, which normally infects the respiratory tracts of smaller mammals. It does not express pertussis toxin although it has the genes to do so which...

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Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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