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Latest Phalacrocorax Stories

Cormorants Show "Superbird" Abilities When Fishing For Prey
2012-08-01 13:33:56

[Watch Video] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Cormorants have long been known to be world class fishing birds, but a new video shows just what these airborne anglers are capable of. Researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the National Research Council of Argentina recently fitted an imperial cormorant from Punta Lèon, a protected area in coastal Argentina, with a small camera, and observed it diving 150 feet underwater in 40...

2011-08-29 11:30:18

A new skin test can determine the age of wild animals while they are still alive, providing information needed to control population explosions among nuisance animals, according to a report here today at the 242nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world largest scientific society with more than 163,000 members, is holding the meeting through Thursday at the Colorado Convention Center and downtown hotels. With 7,500 reports on new advances in...

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2009-05-18 07:10:00

After years of decline, bald eagles are springing forth with an aggressive appetite for great cormorant chicks.It's a phenomenon that threatens to wipe out the U.S. population.Some believe the eagles are finding less fish to eat and instead flying to Maine's remote rocky islands where they've been raiding the only known nesting colonies of great cormorants.In fact, the eagles are causing the numbers of the shiny black birds to fall from more than 250 pairs to 80 pairs since 1992."They're like...

2008-09-18 00:00:00

This hungry cormorant nearly bit off more than it could chew when it decided to make a meal of a very slippery fish. The bird was spotted struggling with a large eel off Monmouth beach in Lyme Regis, West Dorset. It lost its dinner a couple of times and had to dive down to retrieve it. When the eel was finally caught, a group of seagulls arrived to steal it and the bird ducked under the sea again to avoid a brawl. However, its persistence paid off as it polished off the eel with a...

2008-01-24 03:00:00

MADISON -- Double-crested cormorant populations on Green Bay and Lake Michigan in northeastern Wisconsin are expected to fall in the coming years. The Natural Resources Board approved plans on Wednesday targeting the large, fish-eating bird that would cut the number of cormorant nests by about one-half on islands on Green Bay and Lake Michigan. About 90% of the state's breeding population lives in these waters. Cormorant numbers have sharply rebounded since they were almost wiped out in...

2006-11-29 12:00:40

By Steve Vantreese, The Paducah Sun, Ky. Nov. 29--The presence of fish-eating fowl on our area's huge lakes is greatly increased nowadays. Two species of water birds are highly notable because they have come seemingly out of nowhere in recent years to represent a significant presence on Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley -- double-crested cormorants and white pelicans. The snaky-necked cormorants have gone from a rarity to regulars on the lakes. They are diving birds, black as adults and...


Latest Phalacrocorax Reference Libraries

Great Cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo
2013-01-01 16:20:56

The Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), known as the Great Black Cormorant across the Northern Hemisphere, the Black Cormorant in Australia, the Large Cormorant in India and the Black Shag further south in New Zealand, is a widespread member of the cormorant family of seabirds. It breeds in much of the Old World and the Atlantic coast of North America. It’s a large black bird, but there is a wide variation in size in the species wide range. Weight is documented from 3.3 pounds to 11.7...

Guanay Cormorant, Phalacrocorax bougainvillii
2012-11-07 14:49:50

The Guanay Cormorant (Phalacrocorax bougainvillii ), also known as the Guanay Shag, is part of the cormorant family, and it usually resides on the Pacific coast of Peru and northern Chile, however, the Argentinean population on the Patagonian Atlantic coast seems to be extinct. The major habitats of this bird appear to be shallow seawater and rocky shores. This bird’s color is similar to the Rock Cormorant. It has a grayish bill with some red around the base and the face is red with a...

Brandt’s Cormorant, Phalacrocorax penicillatus
2012-03-22 22:57:32

Brandt's Cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus), is a species of marine bird of the cormorant family of seabirds. It inhabits the Pacific coast of North America. Its summer range extends from Alaska to the Gulf of California. The populations north of Vancouver Island migrate south during the winter. The bird’s specific name, penicillatus, is Latin for ‘pencil of hairs,’ in reference to the white plumes on its neck and back during the early breeding season. The common name honors...

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2005-06-09 15:06:48

The Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is a North American member of the cormorant family of seabirds. This species is very common and widespread. They breed in coastal areas as well as near inland rivers and lakes, building stick nests in trees, on cliff edges or on the ground on islands. They are gregarious birds, usually found in colonies, often with other aquatic birds. Their song is a deep, guttural grunt. This bird feeds on the sea and fresh water lakes and rivers....

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2005-06-02 10:32:17

The Phalacrocoracidae family of birds is represented by over thirty species of cormorants and shags. All but three are in the genus Phalacrocorax, with the exceptions being the Galapagos Flightless Cormorant, the Kerguelen Shag and the Imperial Shag. The names "cormorant" and "shag" were originally those of the two species of the family found in Great Britain, Phalacracorax carbo (the Great Cormorant) and P. aristotelis (the Common Shag). "Shag" refers to the bird's crest. As other...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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