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Latest Phanerozoic Stories

walking whales
2015-04-23 09:13:14

The theory that all animal life emerged from the sea has been well covered, but much less is known about the creatures that went back. Whales, dolphins, seals and sea turtles are examples of marine tetrapods--an exceptional group of animals that moved from the sea to the land and back again.

capitanian extinction
2015-04-16 11:41:07

Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com - @BednarChuck New evidence of severe losses in brachiopods in the northern Boreal latitudes around the island of Spitsbergen suggest that the controversial Capitanian extinction event that occurred about 262 million years ago should be classified as a true “mass extinction” event. Previously, the Capitanian extinction event was known only from equatorial settings, and thus its status as a full-fledged global crisis was controversial. However, the...

Chicxulub impact
2015-04-07 11:35:34

For the first time, scientists plan to conduct an expedition to collect and analyze core samples from the 125-mile-wide Chicxulub impact site in Mexico, a crater believed to have been caused by the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs more than 65 million years ago.

Little Foot
2015-04-02 11:11:51

Using advanced dating techniques, a team of researchers from Purdue University and colleagues from France, Canada and South Africa have discovered that the rare and nearly complete “Little Foot” Australopithecus skeleton is among the oldest hominid remains ever discovered.

asteroid crater australia
2015-03-24 09:11:54

A nearly 250 mile (400 km) wide impact zone recently discovered in Central Australia is being called the largest asteroid-caused craters ever discovered, according to research published earlier this month in the international earth sciences journal Tectonophysics.

Macrauchenia patachonica
2015-03-19 12:47:53

Based on remains found by Charles Darwin and others, we knew that a group of mammals known as South American ungulates had a body that resembled a camel, nostrils high on their heads and even short elephant-like trunks.

'carpet of tools'
2015-03-14 09:23:36

A new intensive survey of the Messak Settafet escarpment, a massive outcrop of sandstone in the middle of the Saharan desert, has shown that stone tools occur "ubiquitously" across the entire landscape: averaging 75 artefacts per square metre, or 75 million per square kilometer.

giant rodent incisors tusks
2015-02-06 14:55:21

An ancient, bison-sized rat likely used its massive incisors like elephant tusks, experts from the University of York and The Hull York Medical School (HYMS) claim in a new study.

t. rex
2015-01-14 15:10:07

For years, North American fossils have been the guide post for the late Cretaceous extinction. Now, scientists are finding European fossils have just as much of a story to tell.

sedentary lifestyle
2014-12-23 10:03:48

Humans evolved their current lightweight modern skeletons relatively recently, no earlier than the start of the Holocene about 12,000 years ago and even later in some populations, researchers from the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) report in a new study.


Latest Phanerozoic Reference Libraries

Mapinguari
2014-04-22 13:41:18

Mapinguari The mapinguari or mapinguary is an ape-like cryptid said to inhabit the Amazon rainforests of Brazil and Bolivia. It is also known as the Isnashi. Several attempts to find physical evidence that the creature exists have been conducted. Samples have been gathered, but when analyzed it was found to be from known animals and some of the castings of tracks were inconclusive. Native folklore has described the creature as having only one eye, long claws, backward feet, a...

Palaeovespa
2014-04-18 16:08:43

Palaeovespa is a genus of wasps that holds seven species, all of which are extinct. Two of the species were discovered in Baltic amber deposits from Europe dating back to the middle Eocene era, while the other five were found in Florissant Formation amber from the Priabonian stage era in Colorado in the United States. This genus, and four of its species, was first described in 1906 by Dr. Theodore Cockerell in the Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. Cockerell described all but one...

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

Thescelosaurus
2013-04-28 18:48:11

Thescelosaurus, meaning “godlike”, “wondrous”, or “marvelous” and “lizard” was a genus of small ornithopod dinosaur that appeared at the very end of the Late Cretaceous period in North America. It was a member of the last dinosaurian fauna before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event around 65.5 million years ago. The completeness and preservation of many of its specimens illustrate that it might have preferred to live near streams. This bipedal ornithopod is known from...

Daspletosaurus
2013-04-28 18:27:18

Daspletosaurus, meaning “frightful lizard” is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that resided in western North America between 77 and 74 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period. Fossils of the only named species were found in Alberta, although other possible species from Alberta and Montana wait for description. Daspletosaurus is closely related to the much larger and more current Tyrannosaurus. Like most of the known tyrannosaurids, it was a multi-ton bipedal...

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Word of the Day
sipe
  • a slit in a tire to drain away surface water and improve traction.
The word 'sipe' comes from Old English and is related to 'seep'.
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