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Latest Phanerozoic Stories

New Saber-Toothed Cat Discovery Sheds Light On Interactions Between Early Humans And Predators
2014-04-02 08:15:46

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online At the Schöningen open-cast coal mine in north-central Germany, near Hannover, researchers from the Lower Saxony Heritage Authority and the University of Tübingen have discovered the remains of a saber-toothed cat. The remains were preserved in rock strata some 300,000 years old, placing them during the Paleolithic Era. The Schöningen mine is famous for the discovery of three wooden spears, unearthed in 1997 by Hartmut Thieme of...

artists reconstruction of Tamisiocaris borealis
2014-03-27 09:19:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Several large marine animals have evolved from fearsome predators to become gentle giants that use filtering appendages to ingest food, and new research from a team of European researchers has revealed a similar evolution in a group of predators that roamed the oceans 520 million years ago during the Early Cambrian. According to the team’s report in the journal Nature, an early arthropod called Tamisiocaris borealis used large curly...

Fossil Skeleton Of Australopithecus Is Older Than Previously Believed
2014-03-17 04:51:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Thirteen years of meticulous excavation by South African and French scientists has shown that the nearly complete fossil skeleton of Australopithecus, nicknamed Little Foot, is most likely around 3 million years old. Professor Ron Clark from the University of Witwatersrand led the study, which refutes previous dating claims that suggest Little Foot is younger. The findings, published in a recent issue of the Journal of Human...

Nanuqsaurus hoglundi
2014-03-13 09:43:11

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The reexamination of a dinosaur skull found in Alaska has revealed that it may have belonged to a “smaller cousin” of Tyrannosaurs Rex – not a completely distinct species as originally believed. According to a report on the examination published on Wednesday in the journal PLoS ONE, the skull belonged to a lineage of theropods, or “beast feet,” dinosaurs that includes T. Rex. With most T. Rex fossils coming from temperate...

Ancient Sloths Went Swimming
2014-03-13 05:04:02

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris say ancient sloths once spent some of their time in the ocean. Sloths are known as tree dwellers, but the latest research published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B says that these creatures use to head out into the sea about five to eight million years ago. The team came to this conclusion after analyzing Peruvian sloth fossils belonging to five different...

New Species Of Torvosaurus Was Largest European Land Predator
2014-03-06 08:08:06

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Fossils of Torvosaurus, a large Jurassic-era theropod predator, were first unearthed in North America in 1971, later being named Torvosaurus tanneri. Examples of this dinosaur had not existed elsewhere until 2000, when paleontologists discovered another Torvosaurus fossil in Europe. The discovery, which came from a site just north of Lisbon, Portugal, led scientists to initially assume the remains were that of T. tanneri. However,...

2014-03-03 15:21:05

A failed Saharan Atlantic Ocean rift zone Break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana about 130 Million years ago could have lead to a completely different shape of the African and South American continent with an ocean south of today's Sahara desert, as geoscientists from the University of Sydney and the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences have shown through the use of sophisticated plate tectonic and three-dimensional numerical modelling. The study highlights the importance of rift...

2014-02-12 20:21:31

SEATTLE, Feb. 12, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A spectacular new discovery of Cambrian animal fossils has intensified a source of doubt that troubled Darwin about his theory, according to scientific researchers at Discovery Institute. About 26 miles from the famous Walcott quarry, a new exposure of Burgess Shale fossils has come to light. Called the Marble Canyon quarry, this fossil assemblage, reported in Scientific American, Nature Communications, and elsewhere, appears to be...

Canada's Kootenay National Park Home To Epic Burgess Shale Site
2014-02-12 06:38:48

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale found in Yoho National Park in British Columbia is home to some of the world's earliest animals, including a very primitive human relative. It is also considered to be one of the world's most important fossil sites. More than one hundred years after its discovery, a new Burgess Shale fossil site has been discovered 26 miles away in Kootenay National Park. According to Pomona College geologist...

Permian Mass Extinction May Have Happened In The Blink Of An Eye
2014-02-11 05:07:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 252 million years ago, the largest mass extinction event in the history of animal life on Earth occurred — wiping out more than 96 percent of marine species and 70 percent of terrestrial species. This included the largest insects known to have inhabited the planet. Scientists have explored many theories to explain the cause of the end-Permian extinction, as it came to be known. Those theories include an asteroid...


Latest Phanerozoic Reference Libraries

Mapinguari
2014-04-22 13:41:18

Mapinguari The mapinguari or mapinguary is an ape-like cryptid said to inhabit the Amazon rainforests of Brazil and Bolivia. It is also known as the Isnashi. Several attempts to find physical evidence that the creature exists have been conducted. Samples have been gathered, but when analyzed it was found to be from known animals and some of the castings of tracks were inconclusive. Native folklore has described the creature as having only one eye, long claws, backward feet, a...

Palaeovespa
2014-04-18 16:08:43

Palaeovespa is a genus of wasps that holds seven species, all of which are extinct. Two of the species were discovered in Baltic amber deposits from Europe dating back to the middle Eocene era, while the other five were found in Florissant Formation amber from the Priabonian stage era in Colorado in the United States. This genus, and four of its species, was first described in 1906 by Dr. Theodore Cockerell in the Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. Cockerell described all but one...

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

Thescelosaurus
2013-04-28 18:48:11

Thescelosaurus, meaning “godlike”, “wondrous”, or “marvelous” and “lizard” was a genus of small ornithopod dinosaur that appeared at the very end of the Late Cretaceous period in North America. It was a member of the last dinosaurian fauna before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event around 65.5 million years ago. The completeness and preservation of many of its specimens illustrate that it might have preferred to live near streams. This bipedal ornithopod is known from...

Daspletosaurus
2013-04-28 18:27:18

Daspletosaurus, meaning “frightful lizard” is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that resided in western North America between 77 and 74 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period. Fossils of the only named species were found in Alberta, although other possible species from Alberta and Montana wait for description. Daspletosaurus is closely related to the much larger and more current Tyrannosaurus. Like most of the known tyrannosaurids, it was a multi-ton bipedal...

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Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'