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Latest Phanerozoic Stories

Ancient Sloths Went Swimming
2014-03-13 05:04:02

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris say ancient sloths once spent some of their time in the ocean. Sloths are known as tree dwellers, but the latest research published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B says that these creatures use to head out into the sea about five to eight million years ago. The team came to this conclusion after analyzing Peruvian sloth fossils belonging to five different...

New Species Of Torvosaurus Was Largest European Land Predator
2014-03-06 08:08:06

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Fossils of Torvosaurus, a large Jurassic-era theropod predator, were first unearthed in North America in 1971, later being named Torvosaurus tanneri. Examples of this dinosaur had not existed elsewhere until 2000, when paleontologists discovered another Torvosaurus fossil in Europe. The discovery, which came from a site just north of Lisbon, Portugal, led scientists to initially assume the remains were that of T. tanneri. However,...

2014-03-03 15:21:05

A failed Saharan Atlantic Ocean rift zone Break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana about 130 Million years ago could have lead to a completely different shape of the African and South American continent with an ocean south of today's Sahara desert, as geoscientists from the University of Sydney and the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences have shown through the use of sophisticated plate tectonic and three-dimensional numerical modelling. The study highlights the importance of rift...

2014-02-12 20:21:31

SEATTLE, Feb. 12, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A spectacular new discovery of Cambrian animal fossils has intensified a source of doubt that troubled Darwin about his theory, according to scientific researchers at Discovery Institute. About 26 miles from the famous Walcott quarry, a new exposure of Burgess Shale fossils has come to light. Called the Marble Canyon quarry, this fossil assemblage, reported in Scientific American, Nature Communications, and elsewhere, appears to be...

Canada's Kootenay National Park Home To Epic Burgess Shale Site
2014-02-12 06:38:48

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale found in Yoho National Park in British Columbia is home to some of the world's earliest animals, including a very primitive human relative. It is also considered to be one of the world's most important fossil sites. More than one hundred years after its discovery, a new Burgess Shale fossil site has been discovered 26 miles away in Kootenay National Park. According to Pomona College geologist...

Permian Mass Extinction May Have Happened In The Blink Of An Eye
2014-02-11 05:07:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 252 million years ago, the largest mass extinction event in the history of animal life on Earth occurred — wiping out more than 96 percent of marine species and 70 percent of terrestrial species. This included the largest insects known to have inhabited the planet. Scientists have explored many theories to explain the cause of the end-Permian extinction, as it came to be known. Those theories include an asteroid...

Woolly Mammoths And Other Megafauna Suffered From A Loss Of Plant Diversity
2014-02-06 09:29:49

[ Watch the Video: Diet Changes Killed Off Woolly Mammoths ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have put forth many theories on why woolly mammoths and other large animals went extinct around 10,000 years ago, from the devastating effects of a comet impact to overhunting by humans. A new DNA-based study published in the journal Nature has found that the flowering plants these “megafauna” depended on disappeared from northern Asia and North America...

2014-01-10 10:42:58

An Oxford University study has concluded that our ancient ancestors who lived in East Africa between 2.4 million-1.4 million years ago mainly ate tiger nuts (grass bulbs) supplemented with the odd grasshopper and worm An Oxford University study has concluded that our ancient ancestors who lived in East Africa between 2.4 million-1.4 million years ago survived mainly on a diet of tiger nuts. Tiger nuts are edible grass bulbs still eaten in parts of the world today. The study published in...

Evidence Shows Incest, Interbreeding Common Among Neanderthals
2013-12-18 15:10:49

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Genetic sequencing of DNA extracted from a Neanderthal woman’s toe bone reveals the species was not only incestuous, but also interbred with other types of human ancestors, according to research scheduled for publication in Thursday’s edition of the journal Nature. An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, completed what they are calling the most complete sequencing...

New Hell Creek, Montana Raptor Species Named, Described
2013-12-16 14:43:30

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new species of dinosaur recently discovered in the Hell Creek Formation in Montana has been described as the youngest known dromaeosaurid and was a close cousin of the Velociraptor. The dinosaur, called Acheroraptor temertyorum, was approximately nine feet tall and weighed about 90 pounds when it was alive. The naming and description of this raptoran, which lived in what is now western North America some 66 to 67 million years...


Latest Phanerozoic Reference Libraries

Mapinguari
2014-04-22 13:41:18

Mapinguari The mapinguari or mapinguary is an ape-like cryptid said to inhabit the Amazon rainforests of Brazil and Bolivia. It is also known as the Isnashi. Several attempts to find physical evidence that the creature exists have been conducted. Samples have been gathered, but when analyzed it was found to be from known animals and some of the castings of tracks were inconclusive. Native folklore has described the creature as having only one eye, long claws, backward feet, a...

Palaeovespa
2014-04-18 16:08:43

Palaeovespa is a genus of wasps that holds seven species, all of which are extinct. Two of the species were discovered in Baltic amber deposits from Europe dating back to the middle Eocene era, while the other five were found in Florissant Formation amber from the Priabonian stage era in Colorado in the United States. This genus, and four of its species, was first described in 1906 by Dr. Theodore Cockerell in the Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. Cockerell described all but one...

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

Thescelosaurus
2013-04-28 18:48:11

Thescelosaurus, meaning “godlike”, “wondrous”, or “marvelous” and “lizard” was a genus of small ornithopod dinosaur that appeared at the very end of the Late Cretaceous period in North America. It was a member of the last dinosaurian fauna before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event around 65.5 million years ago. The completeness and preservation of many of its specimens illustrate that it might have preferred to live near streams. This bipedal ornithopod is known from...

Daspletosaurus
2013-04-28 18:27:18

Daspletosaurus, meaning “frightful lizard” is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that resided in western North America between 77 and 74 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period. Fossils of the only named species were found in Alberta, although other possible species from Alberta and Montana wait for description. Daspletosaurus is closely related to the much larger and more current Tyrannosaurus. Like most of the known tyrannosaurids, it was a multi-ton bipedal...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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