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Latest Phanerozoic Stories

Mass Extinction During The Pangea Integration
2013-11-04 03:21:57

The integration of Pangea that began during the early Permian period may have caused the environment to deteriorate, playing a role in the mass extinction event that occurred 250 million years ago.

Dwarfism In Mammals Also Occurred During Second Warming Period
2013-11-03 05:03:03

While scientists have known for several years that some mammals became smaller during a period of warming known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, researchers have found a second instance of mammalian “dwarfing” attributable to increasing temperatures.

Ancient Skull Of Human Ancestor Implies All Homo Species Were One
2013-10-18 06:36:29

An analysis of a 1.8 million-year-old human skull suggests that the earliest members of our Homo genus actually belonged to a single species, a finding that contradicts previous beliefs that there were several different human species walking the Earth during that time.

Evidence Suggests Recycling May Have Started With Early Hominids
2013-10-12 08:28:18

Despite the general perception that recycling is a fairly modern phenomenon, there is growing evidence it dates back to the days of the early hominids, researchers said this week during a four-day conference at Tel Aviv University in Israel.

Mammal Diversity Faltered When Flowering Plants Arrived
2013-10-02 16:02:24

As mammals were trying to emerge from the shadows of dinosaurs 100 million years ago, there was a dramatic proliferation of flowering plants species. However, instead of early mammals benefiting from new food and shelter opportunities that would have been provided by the plants, they experienced a decline during the mid-Cretaceous.

No Single Factor Behind Cambrian Explosion Of Animal Life
2013-09-20 07:58:01

A new study from the UK reveals that the explosion of animal life on Earth that occurred around 520 million years ago was the result of a combination of interlinked factors, rather than a single underlying cause.

Red Meat-Eating Neanderthals May Have Also Been Fish Eaters
2013-09-17 14:22:52

Scientists have theorized that the reason Homo sapiens were able to outcompete Neanderthals was because they embraced a more diverse diet. However, new evidence indicates that Neanderthal menus may have been more diverse than previously thought.

Researchers Unearth Ape Skull In Yunnan Province, China
2013-09-06 14:10:41

Researchers working at Shuitangba, a site in Yunnan Province, China, announced the discovery of a fossilized ape cranium that is highly unique due to the fact that it comes from a juvenile of the species and at a time when apes had become extinct in most of Eurasia.

Earliest Known Scorpion Fossil Discovered In South Africa
2013-09-03 12:41:53

Scientists say they have discovered a 350-million-year-old scorpion fossil, recovered from Devonian formation layers in Grahamstown, South Africa.

End-Permian Mass Extinction Paved Way For Modern Mammals
2013-08-28 16:19:55

Mass extinction certainly sounds like it would be the end of the line, and perhaps even evoke images of the end of the world. However, new research suggests that the end can also be the beginning.


Latest Phanerozoic Reference Libraries

Mapinguari
2014-04-22 13:41:18

Mapinguari The mapinguari or mapinguary is an ape-like cryptid said to inhabit the Amazon rainforests of Brazil and Bolivia. It is also known as the Isnashi. Several attempts to find physical evidence that the creature exists have been conducted. Samples have been gathered, but when analyzed it was found to be from known animals and some of the castings of tracks were inconclusive. Native folklore has described the creature as having only one eye, long claws, backward feet, a...

Palaeovespa
2014-04-18 16:08:43

Palaeovespa is a genus of wasps that holds seven species, all of which are extinct. Two of the species were discovered in Baltic amber deposits from Europe dating back to the middle Eocene era, while the other five were found in Florissant Formation amber from the Priabonian stage era in Colorado in the United States. This genus, and four of its species, was first described in 1906 by Dr. Theodore Cockerell in the Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. Cockerell described all but one...

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

Thescelosaurus
2013-04-28 18:48:11

Thescelosaurus, meaning “godlike”, “wondrous”, or “marvelous” and “lizard” was a genus of small ornithopod dinosaur that appeared at the very end of the Late Cretaceous period in North America. It was a member of the last dinosaurian fauna before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event around 65.5 million years ago. The completeness and preservation of many of its specimens illustrate that it might have preferred to live near streams. This bipedal ornithopod is known from...

Daspletosaurus
2013-04-28 18:27:18

Daspletosaurus, meaning “frightful lizard” is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that resided in western North America between 77 and 74 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period. Fossils of the only named species were found in Alberta, although other possible species from Alberta and Montana wait for description. Daspletosaurus is closely related to the much larger and more current Tyrannosaurus. Like most of the known tyrannosaurids, it was a multi-ton bipedal...

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Word of the Day
marcescent
  • Withering but not falling off, as a blossom that persists on a twig after flowering.
The word 'marcescent' comes from a Latin word meaning 'to wither'.
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