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Latest Philosophy of biology Stories

Egyptian Hieroglyphs
2014-09-10 04:54:50

John Hopton for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online So great is the range of artwork depicting animals in ancient Egyptian artifacts that scientists have utilized them to study the ecosystem of the Nile Valley over 6000 years. They concluded that species extinction and reduced ecological stability were caused by a drying climate and growing human population. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, looked at a range of artwork detailing large mammals, and...

Adult male Barbour's forest tree frog sitting on a branch - Udzungwa Mountains - Tanzania - Africa
2014-09-08 09:24:56

Caron Lett, University of York An international team of researchers has found that the majority of threatened species are ‘invisible’ when using modern methods to predict species distributions under climate change. Using African amphibians as a case study, the researchers found that more than 90 percent of the species listed as threatened on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species are omitted by the most popular tools for species distribution modelling. The study, led by...

Wolverines
2014-09-04 03:00:55

Stephen Sautner, Wildlife Conservation Society A new paper looks at the issues facing biodiversity throughout the world’s mountain regions, sets agenda for conservation. Do we need corridors between “habitat-islands?” A recently published paper provides a history of scientific research on mountain ecosystems, looks at the issues threatening wildlife in these systems, and sets an agenda for biodiversity conservation throughout the world’s mountain regions. The paper,...

dodo bird
2014-09-04 03:30:00

David Orenstein, Brown University The gravity of the world’s current extinction rate becomes clearer upon knowing what it was before people came along. A new estimate finds that species die off as much as 1,000 times more frequently nowadays than they used to. That’s 10 times worse than the old estimate of 100 times. It’s hard to comprehend how bad the current rate of species extinction around the world has become without knowing what it was before people came along. The newest...

2014-09-03 08:34:49

First two courses in program launch on September 1, 2014. STANFORD, Calif., Sept. 3, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Two world-renowned schools - the Stanford School of Medicine and the Stanford School of Engineering - have joined forces to create their first online professional certificate program. The Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate combines Stanford's expertise in medicine, technology and online learning to offer a world class education in genetics and genomics online....

common bluestripe snappers
2014-09-01 02:00:40

John Delaney, Wildlife Conservation Society A new study reports that an expansion of marine protected areas is needed to protect fish species that perform key ecological functions. According to investigators from the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations, previous efforts at protecting fish have focused on saving the largest numbers of species, often at the expense of those species that provide key and difficult-to-replace ecological functions. Many vital ecological...

Asian tapir
2014-09-01 02:05:40

Fred Lewsey, University of Cambridge Researchers have created a ‘large-scale zoning plan’ that aims to limit the environmental costs of road expansion while maximizing its benefits for human development. More than 25 million kilometers of new roads will be built worldwide by 2050. Many of these roads will slice into Earth’s last wildernesses, where they bring an influx of destructive loggers, hunters and illegal miners. Now, an ambitious study has created a ‘global roadmap’...

Hybrid poplar trees
2014-08-26 02:45:23

David Gilbert, DOE/Joint Genome Institute One aspect of the climate change models researchers have been developing looks at how plant ranges might shift, and how factors such as temperature, water availability, and light levels might come into play. Forests creeping steadily north and becoming established in the thawing Arctic is just one of the predicted effects of rising global temperatures. A recent study published online August 24, 2014 in Nature Genetics offers a more in-depth,...

ants sympatric speciation
2014-08-25 03:00:57

Peter Iglinski, University of Rochester A newly-discovered species of ant supports a controversial theory of species formation. The ant, only found in a single patch of eucalyptus trees on the São Paulo State University campus in Brazil, branched off from its original species while living in the same colony, something thought rare in current models of evolutionary development. “Most new species come about in geographic isolation,” said Christian Rabeling, assistant professor of...

honeybee evolution
2014-08-25 06:27:46

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Honeybees are more genetically diverse than originally thought, and the species might have originated from Asia and not Africa as previously believed, according to new research published online Sunday in the journal Nature Genetics. As part of their study, researchers from the Uppsala University Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology and an international team of colleagues present the first global analysis of genome...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.