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Latest Philosophy of perception Stories

2010-10-27 13:51:03

Study suggests brain may adapt to vision loss by increasing speed of tactile perception People who are blind from birth are able to detect tactile information faster than people with normal vision, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The brain requires a fraction of a second to register a sight, sound, or touch. In this study, a group of researchers led by Daniel Goldreich, PhD, of McMaster University explored whether people who have a special reliance on...

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2010-03-11 13:49:38

The human brain processes predictable sensory input in a particularly efficient manner It turns out that there is a striking similarity between how the human brain determines what is going on in the outside world and the job of scientists. Good science involves formulating a hypothesis and testing whether this hypothesis is compatible with the scientist's observations. Researchers in the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt together with the University of Glasgow have shown...

2010-01-07 13:49:52

The space within reach of our hands "” where actions such as grasping and touching occur "” is known as the "action space." Research has shown that visual information in this area is organized in hand-centered coordinates "” in other words, the representation of objects in the human brain depends on their physical location with respect to the hand. According to new research in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, amputation of the...

2009-11-30 14:47:07

TAU is defining the leap from the unconscious to the conscious mind There is a tiny period of time between the registration of a visual stimulus by the unconscious mind and our conscious recognition of it "” between the time we see an apple and the time we recognize it as an apple. Our minds lag behind our eyes, but by how long? And how does this affect our reactions to the world around us? Some estimates say the time delay lasts only 100 milliseconds, others say 500 milliseconds. A new...

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2009-10-02 10:38:35

Research shows for the first time that the brain can latch on to color and assign it to a different object Color is normally thought of as a fundamental attribute of an object: a red Corvette, a blue lake, a pink flamingo. Yet despite this popular notion, new research suggests that our perception of color is malleable, and relies heavily on biological processes of the eye and brain. The brain's neural mechanisms keep straight which color belongs to what object, so one doesn't mistakenly see a...

2009-08-27 14:16:32

Scottish scientists say they've found the human brain predicts the consequences of eye movement even before the eyes take in a new scene. The researchers, led by Amelia Hunt of the University of Aberdeen, asked subjects to shift their eyes to a clock with a fast-moving hand and report the time on the clock when their eyes landed on it. The scientists found the average reported time was 39 milliseconds before the actual time. We've revealed a moment in time when things are not perceived as...

2009-08-20 12:18:53

Your nostrils may seem to be a happy pair, working together to pick up scents. However, a study published online on August 20th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, reveals that there can actually be a kind of rivalry between the two."The two nostrils of a person typically have similar olfactory experience at any given time," said Denise Chen of Rice University. "But in a laboratory setting in which each nostril simultaneously receives a different smell, subjects experience an...

2009-08-05 09:06:46

When you feel you are being touched, usually someone or something is physically touching you and you perceive that your "self" is located in the same place as your body. In new research published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE, neuroscientists at the Ecole Polytechnique F©d©rale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland, investigated the relationship between bodily self-consciousness and the way touch stimuli are spatially represented in humans. They found that sensations...

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2009-07-21 14:35:00

Ducking a punch or a thrown spear calls for the power of the human brain to process 3-D motion, and to perceive an object (whether it's offensive or not) moving in three dimensions is critical to survival. It also leads to a lot of fun at 3-D movies.Neuroscientists have now pinpointed where and how the brain processes 3-D motion using specially developed computer displays and an fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) machine to scan the brain.They found, surprisingly, that 3-D motion...

2009-06-11 12:33:11

It's rare when real-world events perfectly mirror experiments that scientists are conducting.That's why neuroscientists at the University of Washington were delighted at the reactions of former President George W. Bush and Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki when an Iraqi reporter flung his shoes toward the two men during a Baghdad news conference.When Bush ducked and Maliki didn't flinch as the first shoe sailed toward them, it was a real-world example supporting the theory that there are...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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