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Latest Phosphorus Stories

2011-02-11 19:12:14

Attendees of ASU Sustainable Phosphorus Summit take heart, point to economic opportunities, new industry solutions to 'wicked problem' The problem with phosphorus, a critical element in fertilizers and food, is, as comedian Rodney Dangerfield would say, that it "can't get no respect." Increasingly scarce, yet commonly overused in agricultural fields, polluting streams and lakes, this essential component of our bones, our DNA, the periodic table and the dinner table may soon join oil on the...

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2011-02-10 09:09:05

A coupled-cycles framework is essential to balancing human needs with the health of the planet If society wants to address big picture environmental problems, like global climate change, acid rain, and coastal dead zones, we need to pay closer attention to the Earth's coupled biogeochemical cycles. So reports a special issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, published this month by the Ecological Society of America. "There are nearly seven billion people on the planet. And our...

2011-02-08 09:05:00

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, Feb. 8 /PRNewswire/ - In developing its new Howard Quad Complex, a $20 million, 458-bed residence hall, Virginia State University (VSU) relied on Imbrium Systems' SorbtiveFILTER technology to treat stormwater runoff from adjacent parking lots. The Quad Phase I is the first of two projects consisting of four, L-shaped residence halls that will eventually cover the area now occupied by Howard Hall. The University is situated in Chesterfield County at Ettrick on a bluff...

2011-02-03 20:18:42

McGill researchers develop first-ever detailed global map of critical phosphorus use and misuse A growing global population has lead to increasing demands for food. Farmers around the world rely, at least in part on phosphorus-based fertilizers in order to sustain and improve crop yields. But the overuse of phosphorus can lead to freshwater pollution and the development of a host of problems, such as the spread of blue-green algae in lakes and the growth of coastal "Ëœdead zones'. A...

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2011-02-03 12:16:12

Scientists and artists collaborate on accompanying works to address looming environmental issueFertilizer is rarely an inspiration for an art show, but this week at Arizona State University (ASU), sustainability, fertilizer and phosphorus scarcity will provide fuel for creative vision.The art show, a juried exhibition with works by artists from Phoenix, Chicago, Portland and Houston, was created in partnership with scientists engaged in the Sustainable Phosphorus Summit, to take place Feb....

2010-12-17 17:22:24

Rapid turnover and remodelling of lipid membranes could help phytoplankton cope with nutrient scarcity in the open ocean. A team led by Patrick Martin of the National Oceanography Centre has shown that a species of planktonic marine alga can rapidly change the chemical composition of its cell membranes in response to changes in nutrient supply. The findings indicate that the process may be important for nutrient cycling and the population dynamics of phytoplankton in the open ocean. Tiny...

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2010-12-17 09:38:03

Physicists read data after storing them in atomic nuclei for 112 seconds University of Utah physicists stored information for 112 seconds in what may become the world's tiniest computer memory: magnetic "spins" in the centers or nuclei of atoms. Then the physicists retrieved and read the data electronically "“ a big step toward using the new kind of memory for both faster conventional and superfast "quantum" computers. "The length of spin memory we observed is more than adequate to...

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2010-12-06 10:42:28

Continued eutrophication of the Baltic Sea, combined with an ever thinner ozone layer, is favoring the toxic cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena, reveals research from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. "There are several species of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, that can form surface blooms in the Baltic Sea," explains Malin Mohlin from the University of Gothenburg's Department of Marine Ecology. "Which species ends up dominating a bloom depends partly on how they deal with an...

2010-12-02 13:00:00

WASHINGTON, Dec. 2, 2010 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. The microorganism substitutes arsenic for phosphorus in its...

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2010-12-02 13:50:00

Arizona State University scientists and their colleagues have found evidence that the toxic element arsenic can replace the essential nutrient phosphorus in biomolecules of a naturally occurring bacterium, which expands the scope of the search for life beyond Earth.  Scientists understand that all known life requires phosphorus, which is usually in the form of inorganic phosphate.  However, astrobiologists Ariel Anbar and Paul Davies of Arizona State University have...


Latest Phosphorus Reference Libraries

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2005-05-25 19:15:16

In chemistry, a phosphate is a polyatomic ion or radical consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen. In the ionic form, it carries a -3 formal charge, and is denoted PO43-. In a biochemical setting, a free phosphate ion in solution is called inorganic phosphate, to distinguish it from phosphates bound in the form of ATP, or perhaps in DNA or RNA. Inorganic phosphate is generally denoted Pi. Inorganic phosphate can be formed by the reactions of ATP, or ADP, with the formation of the...

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Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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