Quantcast

Latest Photosynthesis Stories

How Some Leaves Get Fat: It's In Their Veins
2013-04-11 15:35:43

Brown University A "garden variety" leaf is a broad, flat structure, but if the garden happens to be somewhere arid, it probably includes succulent plants with plump leaves full of precious water. Fat leaves did not emerge in the plant world easily. A new Brown University study published in Current Biology reports that to sustain efficient photosynthesis, they required the evolution of a fundamental remodeling of leaf vein structure: the addition of a third dimension. Leaves, after all,...

New Insight Into Photosynthesis Provided By University Of Toronto-led Study
2013-04-05 09:22:49

University of Toronto Pigments found in plants and purple bacteria employed to provide protection from sun damage do more than just that. Researchers from the University of Toronto and University of Glasgow have found that they also help to harvest light energy during photosynthesis. Carotenoids, the same pigments which give orange color to carrots and red to tomatoes, are often found together in plants with chlorophyll pigments that harvest solar energy. Their main function is...

New Insights Could Lead To Better Catalysts For Water Splitting
2013-03-29 10:47:24

California Institute of Technology Chemists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory believe they can now explain one of the remaining mysteries of photosynthesis, the chemical process by which plants convert sunlight into usable energy and generate the oxygen that we breathe. The finding suggests a new way of approaching the design of catalysts that drive the water-splitting reactions of artificial photosynthesis. "If we want to...

First Evidence Of Life Deep Under Oceanic Crust Realized
2013-03-15 12:56:53

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Scientists writing in the journal Science say they have found the first direct evidence of life in the deeply buried oceanic crust. Researchers on board the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's (IODP) research vessel JOIDES Resolution drilled a water depth of 1.5 miles and hundreds of feet of sediment into the oceanic crust off the west coast of North America. After examining rock samples from this depth, they were able to uncover...

Researchers Watch Photosynthesis Catalyst In Action
2013-02-15 16:11:08

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used an X-ray laser to get a glimpse of photosynthesis in action. Using the laser, they were able to look at the structure and chemical behavior of a natural catalyst involved in photosynthesis. "This method opens up the way to study changes going on in the catalytic cycle of the water oxidation in nature," Junko Yano, a chemist...

2013-02-12 14:14:20

Emissions from coal power stations could be drastically reduced by a new, energy-efficient material that adsorbs large amounts of carbon dioxide, then releases it when exposed to sunlight. In a study published today in Angewandte Chemie, Monash University and CSIRO scientists for the first time discovered a photosensitive metal organic framework (MOF) - a class of materials known for their exceptional capacity to store gases. This has created a powerful and cost-effective new tool to...

Tree Death In Amazon Much Higher Than Previously Believed
2013-01-29 12:28:36

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around, does it have a direct impact on climate change? A new study from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) set out to answer this question. Forests are critical to the equilibrium of Earth´s climate since they absorb large quantities of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide directly from our atmosphere. The death of a tree, however, reverses the flow of carbon and...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
Related