Quantcast
Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest Photosynthesis Stories

2011-12-19 14:26:12

Algal protein gives boost to electrochemical water splitting Water splitting in photo-electrochemical cells to yield hydrogen is a promising way to sustainable fuels. A team of Swiss and US scientists now made major progress in developing highly efficient electrodes — made of an algal protein, thus mimicking a central step in natural photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is considered the «Holy Grail» in the field of sustainable energy generation because it directly converts...

2011-12-15 17:08:35

A generally accepted 44-year-old assumption about how certain kinds of bacteria make energy and synthesize cell materials has been shown to be incorrect by a team of scientists led by Donald Bryant, the Ernest C. Pollard Professor of Biotechnology at Penn State University and a research professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Montana State University. The research, which will be published in the journal Science on 16 December 2011, is expected to help scientists discover...

2011-12-12 22:04:31

Tomato, watermelon prove most efficient at CO2 accumulation Salt can have drastic effects on the growth and yield of horticultural crops; studies have estimated that salinity renders an about one-third of the world's irrigated land unsuitable for crop production. Imbalances in soil salinity can cause ion toxicity, osmotic stress, mineral deficiencies, and drastic physiological and biochemical changes in plants. Salt stress can even cause plants to adjust their water usage–to conserve...

2011-12-12 21:57:59

Treated seedlings are healthier, more vigorous after transplanting The quality of agricultural seedlings is important to crop growth and yield after transplantation. Good quality seedlings exhibit characteristics such as thick stems, thick leaves, dark green leaves, and large white roots. Scientists have long known that plant development and physiology are strongly influenced by the light spectrum, which affects seedling structure. Raising seedlings irradiated with blue light has been...

2011-12-09 11:52:42

Food prices are soaring at the same time as the Earth's population is nearing 9 billion. As a result the need for increased crop yields is extremely important. New research led by Carnegie's Wolf Frommer into the system by which sugars are moved throughout a plant -- from the leaves to the harvested portions and elsewhere -- could be crucial for addressing this problem. Their work is published Dec. 8 by Science Express. Just as it's necessary for the human body to move nutrients to all of...

2011-12-05 10:00:00

SAN DIEGO, Dec. 5, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Sapphire Energy, Inc., one of the world leaders in algae-based crude oil, today announced that Nucleic Acids Research Journal has published its white paper, "An exogenous chloroplast genome for complex sequence manipulation in algae." As the site of photosynthesis in plants and algae, the chloroplast is responsible for producing organic molecules from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and is thus a crucial metabolic engineering target....

38426_web
2011-12-03 11:56:33

The appearance of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere probably did not occur as a single event, but as a long series of starts and stops, according to an international team of researchers who investigated rock cores from the FAR DEEP project. The Fennoscandia Arctic Russia - Drilling Early Earth Project -- FAR DEEP -- took place during the summer of 2007 near Murmansk in the northwest region of Russia. The project, part of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program,...

2011-11-30 04:43:34

A biomimetic antenna for gathering sunlight may one day transform solar-powered devices. Sometimes when people talk about solar energy, they tacitly assume that we´re stuck with some version of the silicon solar cell and its technical and cost limitations. Not so. The invention of the solar cell, in 1941, was inspired by a newfound understanding of semiconductors, materials that can use light energy to create mobile electrons–and ultimately an electrical current....

2011-11-29 13:40:32

Diminishing nature's carbon storage Australian scientists have reconstructed the past six thousand years in estuary sedimentation records to look for changes in plant and algae abundance. Their findings, published in Global Change Biology, show an increase in microalgae relative to seagrass in the past 60 years. This shift could diminish the ability of estuaries, which are natural global carbon sinks, to mitigate climate change. According to Dr. Peter Macreadie, University of...

They Call It 'Guppy Love'
2011-11-25 04:34:35

UCLA biologists solve an evolution mystery Guppies in the wild have evolved over at least half-a-million years – long enough for the males' coloration to have changed dramatically. Yet a characteristic orange patch on male guppies has remained remarkably stable, though it could have become redder or more yellow. Why has it stayed the same hue of orange over such a long period of time? Because that's the color female guppies prefer. "Sometimes populations have to evolve just to...