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Latest Photosynthesis Stories

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2011-08-29 06:44:31

  How do diamonds the size of potatoes shoot up at 40 miles per hour from their birthplace 100 miles below Earth's surface? Does a secret realm of life exist inside the Earth? Is there more oil and natural gas than anyone dreams, with oil forming not from the remains of ancient fossilized plants and animals near the surface, but naturally deep, deep down there? Can the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, be transformed into a pure solid mineral? Those are among the mysteries being...

2011-08-25 21:35:49

Globally, irrigation increases agricultural productivity by an amount roughly equivalent to the entire agricultural output of the U.S., according to a new University of Wisconsin-Madison study. That adds up to a sizeable impact on carbon uptake from the atmosphere. It also means that water shortages – already forecasted to be a big problem as the world warms – could contribute to yet more warming through a positive feedback loop. The new research quantified irrigation's...

2011-08-19 02:18:10

It is helpful "” even life-saving "” to have a warning sign before a structural system fails, but, when the system is only a few nanometers in size, having a sign that's easy to read is a challenge. Now, thanks to a clever bit of molecular design by University of Pennsylvania and Duke University bioengineers and chemists, such warning can come in the form of a simple color change. The study was conducted by professor Daniel Hammer and graduate students Neha Kamat and Laurel Moses...

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2011-08-16 13:50:00

New research suggests oxygen may have been made on Earth hundreds of millions of years before its debut in the atmosphere. MIT researchers found evidence that tiny aerobic organisms may have evolved to survive on extremely low levels of the gas in these undersea oases. Former MIT graduate student Jacob Waldbauer found while working with colleagues that yeast is able to produce key oxygen-dependent compounds, even with only minuscule puffs of the gas. The research suggests that early...

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2011-08-15 07:17:54

A new study shows that as climate change enhances tree growth in tropical forests, the resulting increase in litterfall could stimulate soil micro-organisms leading to a release of stored soil carbon. The research was led by scientists from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and the University of Cambridge, UK. The results are published online August 14, 2011 in the scientific journal Nature Climate Change. The researchers used results from a six-year experiment in a rainforest at the...

2011-08-03 21:56:31

Agriculture's mobile nature makes predicting regional greenhouse gas impacts more complex Today, farming often involves transporting crops long distances so consumers from Maine to California can enjoy Midwest corn, Northwest cherries and other produce when they are out of season locally. But it isn't just the fossil fuel needed to move food that contributes to agriculture's carbon footprint. New research published in the journal Biogeosciences provides a detailed account of how carbon...

2011-08-02 20:56:47

Researchers have developed a new method to probe the fundamental workings of photosynthesis. The new experimental technique could help scientists better understand the nitty-gritty details of nature's amazingly efficient sunlight-to-fuel conversion system. Plants and other photosynthetic organisms grow by harvesting the sun's energy and storing it in chemical bonds. Antenna proteins, which are made up of multiple light-absorbing pigments, capture sunlight over a large surface area and then...

2011-08-01 14:28:39

Stress protection: How blue-green algae hoard energy Under normal conditions, cyanobacteria, also termed blue-green algae, build up energy reserves that allow them to survive under stress such as long periods of darkness. They do this by means of a molecular switch in an enzyme. By removing this switch, it should be possible to use the excess energy of the bacteria for biotechnological purposes such as hydrogen production, without the bacteria suffering. This was found out by researchers at...

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2011-07-15 09:33:21

By Kim McDonald, UC San Diego Farmers and other astute observers of nature have long known that crops like corn and sorghum grow taller at night. But the biochemical mechanisms that control this nightly stem elongation, common to most plants, have been something of a mystery to biologists"”until now. In this week's early online publication of the journal Nature, biologists at the University of California, San Diego report their discovery of a protein complex they call the "evening...

2011-07-13 07:40:00

IRVINE, Calif., July 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- ChromaDex Corp. (OTCBB.:CDXC) today announced that Cornell University has granted the natural products company ChromaDex exclusive worldwide rights to a novel manufacturing process for nicotinamide riboside (NR). "Despite its potential to deliver significant health benefits, nicotinamide riboside, or NR, is currently not available to the market as a dietary ingredient," said Frank L. Jaksch, Jr., CEO of ChromaDex. "The technology we have...