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Latest Photosynthesis Stories

Life-Bearing Oxygen Appeared On Earth Three Billion Years Ago
2013-09-26 07:19:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from the University of Copenhagen and University of British Columbia (UBC) has revealed that oxygen appeared 700 million years earlier than we previously thought. The findings, published in the journal Nature, raises new questions about the evolution of early life. The research team examined the chemical composition of three-billion-year-old soils from South Africa, which are the oldest soils on Earth. They found...

2013-09-19 15:37:01

Pioneering new research from a team of Indiana University Bloomington biologists has shown for the first time that a protein which has been long known to be critical for the initiation of protein synthesis in all organisms can also play a role in the regulation of gene expression in some bacteria, and probably land plants as well. The protein, called translation initiation factor 3, or IF3, is one of three proteins that make up the core structure of the machinery needed to guide the...

Rising Temperatures Could Upset Natural Ocean Cycles
2013-09-09 04:15:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Rising water temperatures will have an adverse impact on plankton, serving as the catalyst for a series of events that will upset the balance of essential oceanic chemical cycles, according to new research published in Sunday’s edition of the journal Nature Climate Change. Scientists from the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK examined the impact that ocean temperatures can have on the plankton ecosystems found in the...

Dark Ocean Carbon Absorption Not Enough To Restrict Global Warming
2013-09-06 07:46:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by the University of Iowa shows that although microbes that live below 600 feet where light doesn’t penetrate – the so called “dark ocean”-- might not absorb enough carbon to curtail global warming, they do absorb considerable amounts of carbon, meriting further study. The findings of this study were published in the International Society of Microbial Ecology Journal. While many people are familiar with the...

2013-08-23 10:52:41

Researchers report discovery in Science about manganese in aquatic environments An often-overlooked form of manganese, an element critical to many life processes, is far more prevalent in ocean environments than previously known, according to a study led by University of Delaware researchers that was published this week in "Science." The discovery alters understanding of the chemistry that moves manganese and other elements, like oxygen and carbon, through the natural world. Manganese...

Research Could Help Scientists Predict How Carbon Is Stored Underground
2013-08-23 05:49:36

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computer simulations conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) could help scientists make sense of a recently observed and puzzling wrinkle in one of nature’s most important chemical processes. It turns out that calcium carbonate—the ubiquitous compound that is a major component of seashells, limestone, concrete, antacids and myriad other naturally and industrially produced substances—may...

Lab-made Complexes Absorb More Sunlight
2013-08-21 15:47:02

Washington University in St. Louis A ring of protein and pigments, half synthetic and half natural, can be used to quickly prototype light-harvesting antennas that absorb more sunlight than fully natural ones In diagrams it looks like a confection of self-curling ribbon with bits of bling hung off the ribbon here and there. In fact it is a carefully designed ring of proteins with attached pigments that self-assembles into a structure that soaks up sunlight. The scientists who made it...

Extreme Weather Adds To Warming
2013-08-15 05:05:21

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Extreme weather and climate events such as heavy precipitation, violent storms, heat waves and lengthy droughts cause terrestrial ecosystems to absorb approximately 11 billion tons less carbon dioxide each year, according to new research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Nature. That is equivalent to approximately one-third of global CO2 emissions each year, according to an international team of researchers led by...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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