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Researchers Develop Novel Method To Observe Mysterious

Researchers Develop Novel Method To Observe Mysterious Photosynthesis Process

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In the pursuit of a renewable energy source, scientists have been trying to understand the exact mechanism behind photosynthesis, and now a large team of scientists has successfully captured...

Latest Photosystem Stories

Photosynthetic Megacomplex Studied By Scientists
2013-11-29 06:52:19

Washington University in St. Louis Scientists able to study a photosynthetic complex -- arguably the most important bit of organic chemistry on the planet -- in its complete functioning state When sunlight strikes a photosynthesizing organism, energy flashes between proteins just beneath its surface until it is trapped as separated electric charges. Improbable as it may seem these tiny hits of energy eventually power the growth and movement of all plants and animals. They are literally...

2013-07-10 15:19:39

Photosynthesis takes place in specialized membrane systems, made up of stacked disks linked together by unstacked planar leaflets. An LMU team has now identified a protein that tucks the membrane in at the edge of each stack. By making use of sunlight to generate molecular oxygen and other energy-rich chemical compounds that other organisms can utilize as nutrients, photosynthesis provides the basis for almost all life on Earth. Radiant energy from the Sun is captured by pigment-protein...

Manganese Oxidation Played Key Role In Formation Of Oxygen On Earth
2013-06-27 07:25:47

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Oxygen is a necessary component for the survival of most terrestrial life on Earth. The planet´s atmosphere, however, did not always contain this life-sustaining substance. How and when oxygenic photosynthesis — the process responsible for producing oxygen on Earth through the splitting of water molecules — first began has been considered one of the great science mysteries of our planet. A new study, led by...

New Insights Could Lead To Better Catalysts For Water Splitting
2013-03-29 10:47:24

California Institute of Technology Chemists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory believe they can now explain one of the remaining mysteries of photosynthesis, the chemical process by which plants convert sunlight into usable energy and generate the oxygen that we breathe. The finding suggests a new way of approaching the design of catalysts that drive the water-splitting reactions of artificial photosynthesis. "If we want to...

Researchers Watch Photosynthesis Catalyst In Action
2013-02-15 16:11:08

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used an X-ray laser to get a glimpse of photosynthesis in action. Using the laser, they were able to look at the structure and chemical behavior of a natural catalyst involved in photosynthesis. "This method opens up the way to study changes going on in the catalytic cycle of the water oxidation in nature," Junko Yano, a chemist...

Photosynthesis - The Last Link In The Chain
2013-01-05 05:45:05

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For almost three decades, scientists have tried to identify a particular enzyme involved in regulating electron transport during photosynthesis. Now, a research team from Ludwig Maximilians Universitat (LMU) has found the missing link, which turns out to be not so new. All life on Earth is sustained by photosynthesis, a sunlight powered process that provides energy-rich compounds and the molecular oxygen that higher organisms depend...

2012-07-03 10:24:17

Research on the Water Oxidation Reaction in Plants and Bacteria Helps Solve an Important Piece of the Solar Energy Conversion Puzzle; Represents a Major Step Toward a New Generation of Photovoltaics New research led by chemists in the Baruch ´60 Center for Biochemical Solar Energy Research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is seeking to detail the individual steps of highly efficient reactions that convert sunlight into chemical energy within plants and bacteria. In a paper...

2011-11-30 04:43:34

A biomimetic antenna for gathering sunlight may one day transform solar-powered devices. Sometimes when people talk about solar energy, they tacitly assume that we´re stuck with some version of the silicon solar cell and its technical and cost limitations. Not so. The invention of the solar cell, in 1941, was inspired by a newfound understanding of semiconductors, materials that can use light energy to create mobile electrons–and ultimately an electrical current....

2011-08-01 14:28:39

Stress protection: How blue-green algae hoard energy Under normal conditions, cyanobacteria, also termed blue-green algae, build up energy reserves that allow them to survive under stress such as long periods of darkness. They do this by means of a molecular switch in an enzyme. By removing this switch, it should be possible to use the excess energy of the bacteria for biotechnological purposes such as hydrogen production, without the bacteria suffering. This was found out by researchers at...

2011-05-12 22:41:16

In a head-to-head battle of harvesting the sun's energy, solar cells beat plants, according to a new paper in Science. But scientists think they can even up the playing field, says researcher David Kramer at Michigan State University. Plants are less efficient at capturing the energy in sunlight than solar cells mostly because they have too much evolutionary baggage. Plants have to power a living thing, whereas solar cells only have to send electricity down a wire. This is a big difference...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.