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Microplastics Worse For Marine Life Than Previously Thought

Microplastics Worse For Marine Life Than Previously Thought

University of Exeter The tiny plastic particles polluting our seas are not only orally ingested by marine creatures, but also enter their systems through their gills, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter. Scientists also...

Latest Phyla Stories

2014-07-16 23:03:18

A hospital in Springfield, Missouri recently cleared a bed bug infestation from one of its waiting rooms. Bird-X explains how this may have happened and how people can protect themselves. Chicago, IL (PRWEB) July 16, 2014 A hospital in Springfield, MO discovered bed bugs on one of its waiting room couches a few weeks ago in June 2014, according to KY3 News. People were waiting in the infested room when the bugs were discovered much to everyone’s horror. However, it’s very easy to...

2014-07-15 23:07:29

EarthTec QZ announced today that it is officially registered for use in the state of California along with 24 other states to control zebra and quagga mussels in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner. Bentonville, AR (PRWEB) July 15, 2014 EarthTec QZ gains California EPA approval to provide industry’s most economical answer to zebra and quagga mussel proliferation. EarthTec QZ announced today that it is officially registered for use in the state of California along with...

Predatory Characteristics Of Extinct Sea Scorpion Reexamined
2014-07-11 10:42:07

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientist from Yale University studied the extinct pterygotid eurypterid, a giant sea scorpion, the largest arthropod that ever lived. It was always believed to be a fierce predator, but a recent study revealed that may not have been the case. The paper titled, “What big eyes you have: The ecological role of giant pterygotid eurypterids,” is published in the journal Biology Letters. Ross Anderson, a Yale graduate student and...

2014-07-10 12:31:41

USDA The spread of damaging invasive forest pests is only partially powered by the insects’ own wings. People moving firewood for camping can hasten and widen the insects’ spread and resulting forest destruction. A new U.S. Forest Service study gives state planners a tool for anticipating the most likely route of human-assisted spread they can use to enhance survey and public education efforts. The study, “Using a Network Model to Assess Risk of Forest Pest Spread via...

Frog Larvae Have Developed A Defensive Response Against The Red Swamp Crayfish
2014-07-10 03:35:29

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology The common frog is one of the amphibians with the highest distribution in the Iberian Peninsula. It reproduces preferably in permanent areas of water where it comes into contact with the red swamp crayfish, which preys on its larvae. Research carried out by the Spaniard Germán Orizaola from the University of Uppsala (Sweden) confirms that the larvae of these frogs have developed a defensive response to the invasive species. They also...

2014-07-09 11:18:56

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences Increases publication rates 3-10 fold and expands potential for protecting food resources Researchers at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences dug into the last 70 years of peer-reviewed publications about protozoan parasites that infest bivalve mollusks and found that when an organism can be cultured in the laboratory, more papers and greater understanding result. Senior Research Scientists, José Fernández Robledo and Nicholas Record co-authored...

2014-07-08 23:13:57

RESCUE!® fly traps are proven summer solutions for nuisance or filth flies. Spokane, WA (PRWEB) July 08, 2014 Flies are common, annoying and unsanitary. But they’re more than just a nuisance. They’re carriers of filth and more than 60 human and animal diseases. With temperatures warming, experts warn that hot, humid conditions create ideal environments for flies to breed and develop. “The warmer the weather, the faster the flies are produced,” says Dr. Qing-He Zhang, Ph.D.,...

2014-07-03 10:08:00

PLOS New species of spider wasp may use chemical signals from dead ants to protect nest A new species of spider wasp, the 'Bone-house Wasp,' may use chemical cues from dead ants as a nest protection strategy, according to a recent study published July 2, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Michael Staab from University of Freiburg, Germany, and his colleagues from China and Germany. Wasps use a wide variety of nest protection strategies, including digging holes or occupying...

Plants Respond To Leaf Vibrations Caused By Chewing Caterpillars
2014-07-02 03:34:36

[ Watch The Video: Plants Respond To Leaf Vibrations Caused By Insects’ Chewing ] University of Missouri-Columbia Previous studies have suggested that plant growth can be influenced by sound and that plants respond to wind and touch. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri, in a collaboration that brings together audio and chemical analysis, have determined that plants respond to the sounds that caterpillars make when eating plants and that the plants respond with more...

Gene Silencing Technology Alters Sex Of Prawns
2014-07-01 03:28:58

Society for Experimental Biology Israeli scientists have developed a novel method for generating single-sex populations of prawns. This could be used to boost the productivity of aquaculture farms and even as a biocontrol measure against invasive species and pests. Male sexual differentiation in crustaceans is regulated by the androgenic gland. It is thought that this overrides a default program of female differentiation, allowing male features to develop. This comes from the...


Latest Phyla Reference Libraries

Cobweb Spider, Theridiidae
2014-06-23 08:44:11

Theridiidae is a family that contains over 2,200 species of cobweb spiders, also known as tangle-web spiders or comb-footed spiders, which can be found throughout the world. This species received its common names from its tendency to build three dimensional, sticky webs and from the comb of serrated bristles on the fourth leg. It is thought that this family is the only to hold a high diversity of web types, including gumfooted webs, which are highly similar to those produced by spiders in the...

Funnel Weavers, Agelenidae
2014-06-19 13:16:37

Agelenidae is a family that holds about 1,200 recognized species of funnel weaver spiders that occur throughout the world. These spiders build funnel shaped webs that trap prey in their complicated patterns, but they should not be confused with other families of spiders that build funnel webs like funnel-web spiders or funnel-web tarantulas. Funnel weavers can reach an average body length between .1 inches in the smallest species and .7 inches, although the largest species can reach total...

800px-Sparassidae_Palystes_castaneus_mature_female_9923s
2014-06-19 08:25:14

Sparassidae is a family that holds over one thousand species of huntsman spiders, also known as giant crab spiders and wood spiders, or as rain spiders or lizard-eating spiders in some areas of its range. These species are native to Australia but were also introduced to temperate areas throughout the world including China, Japan, and some areas of the United States, including Florida and Hawaii. They inhabit warmer areas and can often be seen entering human habitations and other shelters...

Crab Spiders, Thomisidae
2014-06-19 08:13:57

Thomisidae is a family that holds around two thousand species of crab spiders that can be found throughout the world. Although the name crab spider has been used to refer to a large number of species, it is most often used to refer to members of this family, especially the flower crab spider. Many members of this family have flat bodies that resemble those of crabs and others hold their two front legs in positions that crabs are known for or move in sideways motions as crabs do. Although...

Jumping Spiders, Salticidae
2014-06-19 08:06:16

Salticidae is a family that holds over five thousand species of jumping spiders that can be found throughout the world, including areas with heavy snowfall. Most species prefer to reside in tropical forests, but these spiders can also be found in temperate forests, deserts, and mountainous regions, among other habitats. Although the taxonomic structure of this family is well established, the closest relatives of the family have not yet been identified. Jumping spiders can range in size...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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