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Latest Phyllostomidae Stories

2009-03-25 12:20:01

A U.S.-led study has documented for the first time how bats land and the scientists discovered that not all bats land in the same manner. The Brown University-led researchers said their findings offer new insights into how the Earth's second-largest order of mammals evolved. Daniel Riskin, lead author of the study, said the scientists studied the landing approaches of three species of bats -- two that live in caves and one that roosts in trees. The team filmed each species of bat as it...


Latest Phyllostomidae Reference Libraries

Lesser Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae
2013-08-19 15:45:14

The lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat or more commonly as Sanborn’s long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in a different areas depending upon the season. Its summer range includes southern portions of Arizona, California, and New Mexico and a yearly range in southern and eastern portions of Mexico and coasts of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.  This species prefers a habitat within scrublands,...

Greater Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris nivalis
2013-08-19 15:40:45

The greater long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in Mexico, Guatemala, and the United States. It prefers a habitat within temperate forests or desert scrublands. The greater long-nosed bat migrates seasonally to different areas of is range, most likely due to weather patterns and food abundance. In Mexico, the greater long-nosed bat roosts in male and female colonies, but during midsummer, after...

Southern Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris curasoae
2013-08-19 15:20:27

The southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to South America. It holds a range that includes Venezuela, Colombia, and the islands of Curaçao, Aruba, and Bonaire. It prefers a habitat within arid or semiarid climates along coastlines or in scrublands and thorn forests. The Curacao population was once thought to be a subspecies but is now classified as a population along with other populations of the species. The southern long-nosed bat...

Long-Snouted Bat, Platalina genovensium
2013-06-25 13:02:53

The long-snouted bat (Platalina genovensium) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to Peru. It is known to roost in caves, bridges, and man made structures. This species is known to feed on nectar and pollen, but will consume cactus flowers when in bloom. There is not much known about the habits of this species, but it is thought to be pregnant during the month of September. The long-snouted bat is threatened by habitat loss, which affects its habitat and its food sources, although...

Red Fruit Bat, Stenoderma rufum
2013-06-18 12:15:56

The red fruit bat (Stenoderma rufum), also known as the red fig-eating bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. It prefers a habitat within tropical or subtropical arid forests. There is little known about this species and most of the recorded information about this species has been gathered from a population in the Luquillo Mountains. It holds three subspecies, including Desmarest's Red Fruit Bat. The red fruit bat prefers to roost in...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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