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Latest Physical attractiveness Stories

2010-06-03 13:55:45

The pheromone that attracts female mice to the odour of a particular male has been identified. Named 'darcin' by researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Biology (after Darcy, the attractive hero in Jane Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice"), this unusual protein in a male's urine attracts females and is responsible for learned preference for specific males. Jane Hurst led a team of researchers from the University of Liverpool to carry out the study on over 450 captive bred adult...

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2010-05-22 07:50:00

Lowering voice may be means of signaling attraction, research finds Flirtation may seem largely visual "“ the preening, the coy eye contact "“ but voice plays a role, too. Lowering your voice may be a means of demonstrating attraction, says Susan Hughes, assistant professor of psychology at Albright College in Reading, Pa., in a study, "Vocal and Physiological Changes in Response to the Physical Attractiveness of Controversial Partners," to be published in the fall by the Journal...

2010-05-14 09:42:46

Male physical competition, not attraction, was central in winning mates among human ancestors, according to a Penn State anthropologist. "There is sexual competition in many species, including humans," said David A. Puts, assistant professor of biological anthropology. Many researchers have considered mate choice the main operator in human sexual selection. They thought that people's mating success was mainly determined by attractiveness; but for men, it appears that physical competition...

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2010-05-04 09:36:57

A field study of the relationship between testosterone and natural selection in an American songbird, the dark-eyed junco, has defied some expectations and confirmed others. Scientists from Indiana University Bloomington, the University of Virginia, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and the University of Southern Mississippi report in the June issue of The American Naturalist (now online) that extreme testosterone production -- high or low -- puts male dark-eyed junco at a...

2010-04-21 11:37:00

LEEDS, England, April 21, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Regarding the recent press release: Men With iPhones Are More Attractive to Women We, as an agency, without prior authorisation from our client Phones4U, acted to syndicate press release: Men With iPhones Are More Attractive to Women. The research conducted which led to drawing various conclusions about iPhone usage was not based on a survey produced by Phones 4U, it was produced by a third party with no direct connection to Phones...

2010-04-13 17:29:46

NEWARK, DEL. "“ Jealousy really is "blinding," according to a new study by two University of Delaware psychology professors. They found that women who were made to feel jealous were so distracted by unpleasant emotional images they became unable to spot targets they were trying to find. The researchers suggest that their results reveal something profound about social relationships and perception: It has long been known that the emotions involved in social relationships affect mental...

2010-03-20 11:11:38

SPPS research on testosterone levels and risk-taking in young men Los Angeles, CA -- The presence of an attractive woman elevates testosterone levels and physical risk taking in young men, according to a recent study in the inaugural issue of Social Psychological and Personality Science (published by SAGE). Researchers asked young adult men to perform both easy and difficult tricks on skateboards, first in front of another male and then in front of a young, attractive female. The...

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2010-03-17 14:55:00

Scientists have found that women living in countries that are more disease ridden are far likelier to prefer "masculine" looking men instead of "feminine" looking ones. Psychologists at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland studied a theory that masculine traits in men are a sign of genetic health. According to the hypothesis, this should also have an effect on women, whose choice of a mate is influenced by the chances of their offspring's survival. There were over 4,500 women recruited...

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2010-02-26 10:40:00

Since at least the days of Socrates, humans have been advised to "know thyself." And through all the years, many, including many personality and social psychologists, have believed the individual is the best judge of his or her own personality. Now a psychologist at Washington University in St. Louis has shown that we are not the know-it-alls that we think we are. Simine Vazire, Ph.D., Washington University assistant professor of psychology in Arts & Sciences, has found that the...

2009-11-18 14:19:50

Males have more pronounced personalities than females across a range of species "“ from humans to house sparrows "“ according to new research. Consistent personality traits, such as aggression and daring, are also more important to females when looking for a mate than they are to males. Research from the University of Exeter draws together a range of studies to reveal the role that sexual selection plays in this disparity between males and females. The study shows that in most...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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