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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 14:55 EDT

Latest Physical geography Stories

Small Coral-eating Worm May Mean Big Trouble For Reefs
2014-04-14 13:28:59

University of Southampton New research from the University of Southampton has identified a coral-eating flatworm as a potential threat for coral reefs. It is barely possible to see the parasitic worm Amakusaplana acroporae when it sits on its favorite hosts, the staghorn coral Acropora, thanks to its excellent camouflage. However, the researchers found that the small flatworm could cause significant damage to coral reefs. The scientists from the University of Southampton, who are...

Researchers Decipher Climate Paradox From The Miocene Using Complex Model Simulations
2014-04-14 12:34:00

AWI Scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), have deciphered a supposed climate paradox from the Miocene era by means of complex model simulations. When the Antarctic ice sheet grew to its present-day size around 14 million years ago, it did not get colder everywhere on the Earth, but there were regions that became warmer. A physical contradiction? No, as AWI experts now found out, the expansion of the ice sheet on the Antarctic...

Wildlife Conservation Society Study Shows Iconic Boreal Bird Species Declining In The Adirondacks
2014-04-14 11:30:41

Wildlife Conservation Society A new study from the Wildlife Conservation Society finds that several iconic Adirondack birds are in trouble, with declines driven by the size of their wetland habitats, how connected these wetlands are to one another, and how near they are to human infrastructure. The Adirondack Park represents the southern range extent for several species of boreal forest birds in eastern North America. Like any species at the edge of its range, they face challenges in...

What Lives In The Deepest Part Of The Ocean?
2014-04-11 11:44:48

National Science Foundation "Telepresence" capability will bring mysteries of The Deep to the computer screen A team of researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) will use the world's only full-ocean-depth, hybrid, remotely-operated vehicle, Nereus, and other advanced technology to find out. They will explore the Kermadec Trench at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. The trench, located off New Zealand, is the fifth deepest trench in the world. Its maximum depth is...

Chaos Causes Beauty
2014-04-11 10:57:36

ESA Beautiful streamlined islands and narrow gorges were carved by fast-flowing water pounding through a small, plateau region near the southeastern margin of the vast Vallis Marineris canyon system. Images captured on 7 December 2013 by ESA’s Mars Express show the central portion of Osuga Valles, which has a total length of 164 km. It is some 170 km south of Eos Chaos, which lies in the far eastern section of Valles Marineris. Osuga Valles is an outflow channel that emanates from...

Reef Fish Arrived In Two Waves
2014-04-11 10:11:10

University of California, Davis The world's reefs are hotbeds of biological diversity, including over 4,500 species of fish. A new study shows that the ancestors of these fish colonized reefs in two distinct waves, before and after the mass extinction event about 66 million years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs. Reef fish represent one of the largest and most diverse assemblages of vertebrates, according to Samantha Price, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Evolution and...

How To Save Reefs Containing The Most Diversity With Limited Resources
2014-04-11 09:55:31

Wildlife Conservation Society Marine scientists keen on finding patterns of coral decline and persistence in gradually warming oceans have a complex challenge: how to save reefs containing the most diversity with limited resources. In the Western Indian Ocean, researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Warwick, the ARC Centre for Excellence of Coral Reef Studies, Simon Fraser University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and other groups have found...

Titanic Sailing Conditions Were Not As Extreme As Modern Day
2014-04-11 09:01:42

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One hundred and two years ago this week, the Titanic set off on its fateful maiden voyage from the United Kingdom. Coinciding with that anniversary is a new report from British researchers who have determined the conditions surrounding the iceberg that would eventually take 1,517 lives. According to the report, which was published in the journal Weather, 1912 was not an exceptionally high year for icebergs – particularly in light of...

2014-04-10 23:04:36

Project Geographer to receive National Hurricane Conference’s Outstanding Achievement Award in Emergency Management for developing an interactive data tool based on TerraGo’s GeoPDF® technology. Washington, DC (PRWEB) April 10, 2014 Lauren Hand, a Dewberry Project Geographer is receiving the Outstanding Achievement Award in Emergency Management during the upcoming National Hurricane Conference in Orlando, Florida. Hand developed a new geospatial tool that integrates data from...

2014-04-08 16:21:12

SCOTTSDALE, AZ, April 8, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - Chaparral Gold Corp. ("Chaparral") (TSX: CHL) announces that a settlement has been reached whereby the Chaparral Shareholder Rights Plan has been cease traded (cancelled) and Waterton Precious Metals Fund II Cayman, LP ("Waterton") has extended its hostile offer (the "Hostile Bid") to acquire all of the outstanding common shares of Chaparral from April 11, 2014 to 5:00 p.m. (Toronto time) on April 22, 2014. In addition, Waterton has...


Latest Physical geography Reference Libraries

Young Kerry Bog Pony
2014-04-17 12:16:10

The Kerry Bog Pony originated in Ireland, possibly a descendent of the Irish Hobby Horse, originally inhabiting the peat bogs of County Kerry, southwest Ireland. Although the exact origin of the Kerry Bog Pony is unknown, images from a 1617 book show similarities to the Irish Hobby as well as the Kerry Bog of today. The pony was initially used for transporting peat and kelp from the bog over a variety of terrain. Some were used to pull carts and others were for harness. When they were not...

Laurel, Laurus novocanariensis
2014-02-14 14:59:58

Laurus novocanariensis is a large shrub or tree that belongs to the Lauraceae family. The genus includes 3 species each containing several overlapping characteristics. L. novocanariensis can grow up to 66 feet high. It has aromatic, dark green glossy and leathery leaves, which have small glands in the armpit of the spine. The shrub or tree has lateral veins. It bears small white flowers that are about .4 inches in diameter.  The flowers are born in pairs beside a leaf. The fruit it...

Sharlie, Lake Monster
2014-01-30 18:08:56

Sharlie is a cryptid that is believed to inhabit Payette Lake near McCall, Idaho. Other names for this reptile-like creature are Slimy Slim or The Twilight Dragon of Payette Lake. Native Americans believed that an evil spirit lived in the lake before western settlers arrived in the area. The first documented sighting of the creature was in 1920 when a group of workers saw what they thought was a log, but it began to move. In August 1944, several groups of people reported seeing a 30...

Sir Edmund Percival Hillary
2014-01-06 11:03:49

Sir Edmund Percival Hillary was a New Zealand mountaineer, explorer and philanthropist. Hillary was born to Percival Augustus Hillary and Gertrude Hillary in Auckland, Dominion of New Zealand on July 20th of 1919. In 1920 his family moved to Tuakau, after his father was given land there. His grandparents were early settlers in the northern part of Wairoa in the middle of the 19th century after emigrating from Yorkshire, England. On May 29th of 1953, Hillary and Nepalese Sherpa mountaineer...

Willem Barentsz
2014-01-02 12:34:07

Willem Barentsz, born around 1550 and died on June 20th of 1597, was a Dutch navigator, explorer, cartographer, and a leader of early expeditions to the far north. He was born on the island Terschelling in the Seventeen Provinces. A cartographer by trade, he sailed to Spain and the Mediterranean to finish an atlas of the Mediterranean area, which he co-published with Petrus Plancius. His career as an explorer was spent searching for the Northeast Passage, which he reasoned must exist...

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