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Latest Physiology of dinosaurs Stories

Revision To Rules To Decipher Color In Dinosaurs Suggests Connection Between Color And Physiology
2014-02-13 12:36:46

University of Texas at Austin New research that revises the rules allowing scientists to decipher color in dinosaurs may also provide a tool for understanding the evolutionary emergence of flight and changes in dinosaur physiology prior to its origin. In a survey comparing the hair, skin, fuzz and feathers of living terrestrial vertebrates and fossil specimens, a research team from The University of Texas at Austin, the University of Akron, the China University of Geosciences and four...

Giants Of Earth's History Still Pose A Wealth Of Riddles
2014-01-14 10:32:20

Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz Sauropods, the largest land animals in Earth's history, are still mightily puzzling the scientists. These plant-eating dinosaurs with their long necks and small heads could reach a height of 10 meters or more and dominated all other land vertebrates in terms of size. They could weigh up to 80 tons, more than any other known land vertebrate. One question that has been intensely debated is how these giants of the animal kingdom regulated their own body...

Fossil Discovery May Be Of Earliest Living Dinosaur
2012-12-05 09:40:27

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Some of the earliest known dinosaurs to have walked the planet were considered to be small dinosaurs like the swift-footed Eoraptor. But researchers have discovered a new dinosaur-like fossil that may be even older. Called Nyasasaurus parringtoni, the specimen is thought to have existed 10 to 15 million years earlier than dinosaur fossils have previously shown, originating in the Middle rather than the Late Triassic Period. Study...

Feathered Dinosaurs May Have Been The Norm
2012-07-03 09:47:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the most complete dinosaur fossils ever discovered suggests that feathered dinosaurs were more prevalent than previously thought and could have been the norm, not the exception. The 150 million-year-old fossil found in northern Bavaria shows that the dinosaur had down-like feathers over parts of its front and back as well on its tail. Scientists dubbed the creature Sciurumimus albersdoerferi after "Scirius”, the scientific...

Dinosaurs May Not Have Been Cold-Blooded After All
2012-06-28 10:13:58

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A new study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, suggests that dinosaurs were warm-blooded creatures, not cold-blooded reptiles as previously thought. According to BBC News Science and Technology Reporter Jason Palmer, researchers have disproven one of the primary bits of evidence supporting the four-decade-old theory that dinosaurs were cold blooded. That evidence, skeletal markings on the creatures' bones known as...

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2011-06-24 11:40:00

Scientists have found a way to take the temperature of dinosaurs that have been extinct for millions of years. But since you cannot take their temperature like you do with humans, the researchers did the next best thing -- study dinosaur teeth, which can reflect body temperature. What they found is surprising. Studying the teeth of the long-necked Brachiosaurus, they discovered it had a temperature of about 100.8 degrees F and the smaller Camarasaurus had a temp of 98.3 degrees. Humans...

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2009-11-11 08:07:31

Were dinosaurs "warm-blooded" like present-day mammals and birds, or "cold-blooded" like present day lizards? The implications of this simple-sounding question go beyond deciding whether or not you'd snuggle up to a dinosaur on a cold winter's evening. In a study published this week in the journal PLoS ONE, a team of researchers, including Herman Pontzer, Ph.D., assistant professor of anthropology in Arts & Sciences, has found strong evidence that many dinosaur species were probably...

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2009-10-09 12:25:00

Experts say new research reveals that the Archaeopteryx, which has long been viewed as the archetypal first bird, was actually a lot less "bird-like" than scientists originally thought. Archaeopteryx (from the Greek for "ancient wing"), lived 150 million years ago during the Late Jurassic period in what is now Germany. New microscopic images of the ancient cells and blood vessels inside the bones of the winged, feathered, claw-handed creature show unexpectedly slow growth and maturation that...

2009-08-06 12:01:23

The fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex may not have feasted on feisty adult game, but eyed smaller, more docile prey at chow time, German researchers reported. T-rex fossils indicate the large predatory dinosaurs preyed on juvenile dinosaurs, researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat in Munich reported Thursday in a news release. Unlike their adult and well-armed relatives these young animals hardly posed any risk to the predators, Oliver Rauhut said. And their tender bones would have added...

2009-08-06 10:43:32

Two titans fighting a bloody battle "“ that often turns fatal for both of them. This is how big predatory dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus are often depicted while hunting down their supposed prey: even larger herbivorous dinosaurs. The fossils, though, do not account for that kind of hunting behavior but indicate that theropods, the large predatory dinosaurs, were frying much smaller fish. Dr. Oliver Rauhut, paleontologist at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich, and his...


Latest Physiology of dinosaurs Reference Libraries

Robert Thomas Bakker
2014-04-22 14:27:45

Robert Thomas Bakker (born March 24, 1945) is an American Paleontologist known for his contribution to the “Dinosaur Renaissance” and his support of his mentor Ostrom’s theory that some dinosaurs were warm-blooded. He specializes in the ecological context and behavior of dinosaurs. Bakker was born in Bergen County, New Jersey. As a young boy, he developed an interest in dinosaurs following his first trip to the dinosaur exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History – he was...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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