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Latest Phytochrome Stories

Aquatic Algae Can See A Wide Spectrum Of Light
2014-05-02 03:00:50

[ Watch The Video: Algae “See” A Wide Spectrum Of Light ] Andy Fell, UC Davis Aquatic algae can sense an unexpectedly wide range of color, allowing them to sense and adapt to changing light conditions in lakes and oceans. The study by researchers at UC Davis was published earlier this year in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Phytochromes are the eyes of a plant, allowing it to detect changes in the color, intensity, and quality of light so that the...

2012-07-23 20:41:01

Light is not only the source of a plant's energy, but also an environmental signal that instructs the growth behavior of plants. As a result, a plant's sensitivity to light is of great interest to scientists and their research on this issue could help improve crop yields down the road. Similarly understanding a plant's temperature sensitivity could also help improve agriculture and feed more people. Two new papers from Carnegie's Zhiyong Wang laboratory identify key aspects of the hormonal...

2012-04-16 12:54:52

Findings could lead to high-yield crops that gather light more efficiently and make better use of farmland Mild mannered though they seem, plants are extremely competitive, especially when it comes to getting their fair share of sunlight. Whether a forest or a farm, where plants grow a battle wages for the sun's rays. A plant's primary weapon in this fight is the ability to grow towards the light, getting just the amount it needs and shadowing its competition. Now, scientists at the...

2010-09-27 17:25:27

Nectar production in lima beans depends on light quality Flowering plants produce nectar to attract insect pollinators. Some plant species, such as Lima bean, also secrete nectar from so-called extrafloral nectaries to attract ants which in turn fend off herbivores. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute in Jena, Germany, have discovered that the production of extrafloral nectar is light dependent. They have shown that the plants are able not only to distinguish between day and night, but...

2010-07-01 12:00:16

A team of researchers from Duke University and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has found a central part in the machinery that turns plants green when they sense light. In the Rube Goldberg world of cellular mechanics, this key player turns out to be a garbage truck. Light is so essential for plants that they have two different systems to take advantage of it, explains Meng Chen, an assistant professor of biology at Duke. There's the familiar system of organelles called chloroplasts...

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2010-06-25 08:11:42

For a plant, light is life. It drives everything from photosynthesis to growth and reproduction. Yet the chain of molecular events that enables light signals to control gene activity and ultimately a plant's architecture had remained in the dark. Now a team of researchers from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and Duke University have identified the courier that gives the signal to revamp the plant's gene expression pattern after photoreceptors have been activated by light. "Light is...

2010-06-01 13:40:01

New findings will help scientists understand how plants respond to light When the first warm rays of springtime sunshine trigger a burst of new plant growth, it's almost as if someone flicked a switch to turn on the greenery and unleash a floral profusion of color. Opening a window into this process, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborators at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, have deciphered the structure of a molecular "switch"...

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2009-11-11 14:25:37

Charting femtosecond energy flow could aid redesign of molecules to improve light capture University of California, Berkeley, chemists have discovered the secret to the success of a jellyfish protein whose green glow has made it the darling of biologists and the subject of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The researchers' study of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the structural changes it undergoes when it fluoresces is the cover story of the Nov. 12 issue of the journal...

2009-05-08 09:20:02

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego "“ led by 2008 Nobel-Prize winner Roger Tsien, PhD "“ have shown that bacterial proteins called phytochromes can be engineered into infrared-fluorescent proteins (IFPs). Because the wavelength of IFPs is able to penetrate tissue, these proteins are suitable for whole-body imaging in small animals. Their findings will be published in the May 8 edition of the journal Science."The development of IFPs may be important for future...

2009-04-01 15:03:04

British scientists say they have made a discovery about plant growth that might have an enormous impact on crop production as global warming increases. Researchers at the universities of Leicester and Oxford say they've identified a gene that's responsible for controlling plant growth in elevated temperatures. Dr. Kerry Franklin of the University of Leicester Department of Biology led the study that identified a single gene responsible for controlling plant growth responses to elevated...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.