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Latest Phytoplankton Stories

2009-07-07 15:20:00

Southampton scientists have demonstrated an unexpected role of iron in regulating biological production in the high-latitude North Atlantic. Their findings have important implications for our understanding of ocean-climate interactions.Tiny plant-like organisms called phytoplankton dominate biological production in the sunlit surface waters of the world's oceans and, through the process of photosynthesis, sequester large amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide. A proportion of the carbon is...

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2009-06-20 09:10:56

IFM-GEOMAR-biogeochemists feed Saharan dust to enigmatic fertilizer plankton The tropical Atlantic waters around Cape Verde are very low in plant nutrients.  Nitrogen is in especially short supply and limits the growth of the phytoplankton, the tiny plants that are at the basis of the food chain in the ocean. In this area, the nutrients fall out from the sky: Trade winds carry Saharan dust rich in iron and phosphorus which can fertilize the surface of the ocean.  This was one of the...

2009-05-28 12:43:36

Researchers are using the U.S. space agency's Aqua satellite to conduct the first global analysis of the health and productivity of ocean plants. Ocean scientists can now remotely measure the amount of fluorescent red light emitted by phytoplankton and assess how efficiently these microscopic plants turn sunlight and nutrients into food through photosynthesis, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said. Single-celled phytoplankton fuel nearly all ocean ecosystems and the health of...

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2009-05-28 12:40:00

A unique signal detected by NASA's Aqua satellite is helping researchers check the health and productivity of ocean plants around the world. Fluorescent red light emitted by ocean phytoplankton and detected by Aqua reveals how efficiently the microscopic plants are turning sunlight and nutrients into food through photosynthesis. "This is the first direct measurement of the health of the phytoplankton in the ocean," says Michael Behrenfeld, a biologist at Oregon State University who...

2009-05-28 12:00:00

WASHINGTON, May 28 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Researchers have conducted the first global analysis of the health and productivity of ocean plants using a unique signal detected by NASA's Aqua satellite. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Ocean scientists can now remotely measure the amount of fluorescent red light emitted by phytoplankton and assess how efficiently these microscopic plants turn sunlight and nutrients into food through photosynthesis. Researchers...

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2009-05-07 09:05:40

Plankton blooms do not send atmospheric carbon to the deep ocean Oceanographers Jim Bishop and Todd Wood of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have measured the fate of carbon particles originating in plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean, using data that deep-diving Carbon Explorer floats collected around the clock for well over a year. Their study reveals that most of the carbon from lush plankton blooms never reaches the deep ocean. The surprising...

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2009-04-10 08:05:36

Study shows how algae may cope with environmental change Scientists from two-dozen research organizations led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have decoded genomes of two algal strains, highlighting the genes enabling them to capture carbon and maintain its delicate balance in the oceans. These findings, from a team led by Alexandra Z. Worden of MBARI and published in the April 10 edition of the...

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2009-03-24 14:18:16

Scientists in Germany and India said an experiment to determine whether depositing hundreds of tons of dissolved iron in the Southern Ocean can diminish global warming has produced disappointing results. In conducting the research, scientists "fertilized" a 115 square mile area of ocean by placing six tons of dissolved iron inside the core of an eddy -- a large, rotating column of water. The researchers hoped the iron would stimulate the growth of tiny planktonic algae known as phytoplankton,...

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2009-03-23 06:55:00

A dangerous nerve toxin emitted by algae off California's coast seems to be distressing creatures in the deep ocean. U.S. researchers believe this poisonous algae is a much larger danger that originally thought. According to a Reuters report, this algea, known as Pseudo-nitzschia, can create hazardous, large amounts of domoic acid. "It's a natural neurotoxin. It is produced by a diatom, which is a phytoplankton. As other animals eat this phytoplankton, like sardines or anchovies, this toxin...

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2009-03-17 08:46:53

Scientists have long established that the Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming spots on Earth. Now, new research using detailed satellite data indicates that the changing climate is affecting not just the penguins at the apex of the food chain, but simultaneously the microscopic life that is the base of the ecosystem. The research was published in the March 13 edition of Science magazine by researchers with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) LTER (Long Term Ecological...


Latest Phytoplankton Reference Libraries

Chilean Sea Urchin, Loxechinus albus
2013-01-28 14:52:23

Image Caption: Chilean Sea Urchin, Loxechinus albus. Credit: Dentren/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) The Chilean sea urchin (Loxechinus albus) is a species that can be found along the coastlines of Chile and Peru. It is typically found in shallow waters at or below the tide level, buried in sand or lying just on top of it. This species is often associated with Macrocystis pyrifera, a type of kelp. It is most often found in more open spaces. The Chilean sea urchin can reach an average width of...

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Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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