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Latest Phytoplankton Stories

2008-08-13 18:00:36

By Anonymous The brilliant beamlines of the Australian Synchrotron are finding a host of environmental applications, from studying the chemistry of the upper atmosphere to developing better catalysts for hydrogen production. Detecting and precisely locating specific atoms and molecules is one of the things synchrotrons do best. That makes them very useful for many environmental applications. The Australian Synchrotron's microspectroscopy beamline, for instance, can be used as a probe to...

2008-08-09 03:00:24

By Lapointe, Mathieu MacKenzie, Tyler D B; Morse, David The oceans globally constitute an important sink for carbon dioxide (CO2) due to phytoplankton photosynthesis. However, the marine environment imposes serious restraints to carbon fixation. First, the equilibrium between CO2 and bicarbonate (HCO^sub 3^-) is pH dependent, and, in normal, slightly alkaline seawater, [CO2] is typically low (approximately 10 mM ). Second, the rate of CO2 diffusion in seawater is slow, so, for any cells...

2008-07-21 21:00:22

A seasonal bloom of ocean plankton is pulling more carbon dioxide than previously thought from the atmosphere into the Atlantic Ocean, U.S. researchers said. The bloom -- nurtured by the Amazon River -- may be enough to turn the tropical Atlantic from a net source of atmospheric carbon into a net carbon sink that removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, New Scientist reported. Ajit Subramaniam, an oceanographer at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, N.Y., and his colleagues...

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2008-07-14 18:35:00

It's summertime and people are flocking to the coasts around the country. But when summer storms arrive, it's not only beach-goers who are affected; the rains can also have an impact on living creatures far below the ocean surface. Summer storms sweep fertilizers into the rivers and streams and carry them to the shoreline. Once the plumes of storm and river runoff reach the coast, the nutrients in fertilizers can feed tiny ocean plants, called phytoplankton, which can bloom and create "dead...

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2008-05-23 10:00:00

An international team of scientists surveying the waters of the continental shelf off the West Coast of North America has discovered for the first time high levels of acidified ocean water within 20 miles of the shoreline, raising concern for marine ecosystems from Canada to Mexico.Researchers aboard the Wecoma, an Oregon State University research vessel, also discovered that this corrosive, acidified water that is being "upwelled" seasonally from the deeper ocean is probably 50 years old,...

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2008-03-19 16:40:00

Is the Dust-Storm Theory Overblown? Most oceanographers have assumed that, in the areas of the world's oceans known as High Nutrient, Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the iron needed to fertilize infrequent plankton blooms comes almost entirely from wind-blown dust. Phoebe Lam and James Bishop of the Earth Sciences Division at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have now shown that in the North Pacific, at least, it just isn't so. In a forthcoming issue of...

2008-03-11 18:06:40

Stanford, CA -- A startling discovery by scientists at the Carnegie Institution puts a new twist on photosynthesis, arguably the most important biological process on Earth. Photosynthesis by plants, algae, and some bacteria supports nearly all living things by producing food from sunlight, and in the process these organisms release oxygen and absorb carbon dioxide. But two studies by Arthur Grossman and colleagues*+ reported in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta and Limnology and Oceanography...

2008-01-14 09:40:09

Certain fish could disappear from restaurant menus and our plates at home by 2100, as global warming changes ocean food webs, a new study suggests. Climate change has the potential to threaten ecosystems all over the world, and those in the ocean are no exception. Two marine ecologists led a study of the effects of climate change on the food web of the Bering Sea, which currently provides about half of the fish caught in U.S. waters each year and nearly a third caught worldwide....

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2008-01-11 14:15:00

By 2100, warmer oceans with more carbon dioxide may no longer sustain 1 of the world's most productive fisheries, says USC marine ecologistThe last fish you ate probably came from the Bering Sea. But during this century, the sea's rich food web"”stretching from Alaska to Russia"”could fray as algae adapt to greenhouse conditions."All the fish that ends up in McDonald's, fish sandwiches"”that's all Bering Sea fish," said USC marine ecologist Dave Hutchins, whose former...

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2007-10-11 06:00:00

MIAMI -- The sturdy steel trawler spent the summer on Fort Lauderdale's New River, but the sheltered waters haven't kept the company that owns it from an international storm of controversy over whether its owners' real aim is to help save the planet or just turn a profit. Planktos, a small California company, intends to spread as much as 100 tons of pulverized iron over the vast Pacific Ocean off the Galapagos Islands, hoping it will fertilize a rich crop of carbon dioxide-gobbling...


Latest Phytoplankton Reference Libraries

Chilean Sea Urchin, Loxechinus albus
2013-01-28 14:52:23

Image Caption: Chilean Sea Urchin, Loxechinus albus. Credit: Dentren/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) The Chilean sea urchin (Loxechinus albus) is a species that can be found along the coastlines of Chile and Peru. It is typically found in shallow waters at or below the tide level, buried in sand or lying just on top of it. This species is often associated with Macrocystis pyrifera, a type of kelp. It is most often found in more open spaces. The Chilean sea urchin can reach an average width of...

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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