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Latest Pine Stories

Noise Pollution Has Effect On Plants, Study Finds
2012-03-23 06:50:06

A new study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B has found that human noise like traffic can have ripple effects on plants. Lead author Clinton Francis of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) in Durham, North Carolina, said the consequences of noise could last for decades, even after the source of the noise goes away. Previous studies found that some animals increase in numbers near noisy sites, while others decline, but the results of the new study found...

2012-03-15 16:45:55

A new study of the composition of pine nuts, including those associated with "pine mouth," leaves unsolved the decade-old mystery of why thousands of people around the world have experienced disturbances in taste after eating pine nuts. The report on pine nuts or pignolia – delicious edible nuts from pine trees enjoyed plain or added to foods ranging from pasta to cookies – appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. Ali Reza Fardin-Kia, Sara M. Handy and...

2011-08-12 11:44:00

SALT LAKE CITY, Aug. 12, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- SilverLeaf Financial is the new owner of the 619-acre private golf course and residential community known as "Pine Canyon" in Flagstaff, Arizona. One of Arizona's best-kept secrets, and many residents will agree, Pine Canyon is a community that caters to families as well as passionate golfers. Located adjacent to the Coconino National Forest, Pine Canyon is primarily known for its unforgettable, award-winning golf course. The Jay Morrish...

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2011-06-10 09:59:08

Researchers see increase in snowpack under bare dead pine trees, earlier melt under dead trees with red needles A new University of Colorado Boulder study indicates the infestation of trees by mountain pine beetles in the high country across the West could potentially trigger earlier snowmelt and increase water yields from snowpack that accumulates beneath affected trees. Led by CU-Boulder geological sciences department doctoral student Evan Pugh, the study was undertaken near Grand Lake,...

2011-04-04 20:11:09

A University of Alberta-led research team has determined that the mountain pine beetle has invaded jack pine forests in Alberta, opening up the possibility for an infestation that could stretch across the Prairies and keep moving east towards the Atlantic. A group of U of A tree biologists and geneticists discovered that, as the mountain pine beetle spread eastward from central British Columbia, it successfully jumped species from its main host, the lodgepole pine, to the jack pine. Jack pine...

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2011-02-28 11:39:18

Lodgepole pine, a hardy tree species that can thrive in cold temperatures and plays a key role in many western ecosystems, is already shrinking in range as a result of climate change "“ and may almost disappear from most of the Pacific Northwest by 2080, a new study concludes. Including Canada, where it is actually projected to increase in some places, lodgepole pine is expected to be able to survive in only 17 percent of its current range in the western parts of North America. The...

2011-02-17 12:55:41

New study of Clark's nutcrackers suggests that their caching of whitebark pine seeds is less effective than previously thought at restoring populations of the declining conifer The caching of whitebark pine seeds by the Clark's nutcracker in late summer and early fall may not be enough to regenerate populations of the imperiled conifer in most of its range, scientists have found. Their research"”which is featured in the February issue of Science Findings, a monthly publication of the...

2011-01-24 18:33:56

The genome of the fungus that helps mountain pine beetles infect and kill lodgepole pines has been decoded in a University of British Columbia study. Also known as blue stain fungus for the stain it leaves in the wood of infected trees, Grosmannia clavigera is carried to the host trees by pine beetles and weakens the trees' natural defense system, allowing pine beetles to feed and reproduce in the tree bark. A successful beetle-fungus attack ultimately causes tree death. Now, researchers from...

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2010-09-09 08:41:09

By studying similarities in the genes of Scots Pine trees, scientists have shown that the iconic pine forests of Highland Scotland still carry the traces of the ancestors that colonized Britain after the end of the last Ice Age, harboring genetic variation that could help regenerate future populations, according to new results published in the journal Heredity. The research was carried out by an international team from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, the Polish Academy of Sciences,...

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2010-09-09 06:45:47

If your summer travels have taken you across the Rocky Mountains, you've probably seen large swaths of reddish trees dotting otherwise green forests. While it may look like autumn has come early to the mountains, evergreen trees don't change color with the seasons. The red trees are dying, the result of attacks by mountain pine beetles. Mountain pine beetles are native to western forests, and they have evolved with the trees they infest, such as lodgepole pine and whitebark pine trees....


Latest Pine Reference Libraries

Shortleaf Pine, Pinus echinata
2014-04-14 11:10:26

Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) is native to the southeastern United States. This tree is found in 22 states and has a range from 10 feet in elevation up to 3000 feet. The range includes southeastern New York and New Jersey west to Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, Kentucky, southwestern Illinois, and southern Missouri; south to eastern Oklahoma and eastern Texas; and east to northern Florida and northeast through the Atlantic Coast States to Delaware. This pine can grow in wetlands as well as in...

Scots Pine
2014-04-14 10:50:20

Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is the only native pine to Europe and Asia and was introduced in New Zealand and the colder climates of North America. The Scots pine grows at sea level to 3281 feet in the northern regions and 3937-8530 feet in the south. The Scots pine grows to heights of 114 feet with a trunk that is just over three feet through. The bark is thick and dark grey-brown on the lower trunk with the upper trunk having bark that is thin and orange. The trunk is long and straight...

Sand Pine, Pinus clausa
2014-04-14 10:28:55

Sand Pine (Pinus clausa) is found along the Florida coasts line mainly the Florida Peninsula from Tampa to Naples on the Gulf Coast and from St. Augustine to Fort Lauderdale on the Atlantic Coast. Some trees can be found in higher elevations of the peninsula from Clay County to Lake Okeechobee. The sand pine grows best in sandy and otherwise unsuitable soil depleted of any nutrients. The sand pine is a short and shrubby tree, which grows to heights of 16-33 feet with some growing to 69...

Austrian Pine, Pinus nigra
2014-02-26 10:11:45

Austrian pine (Pinus nigra), also known as the European Black Pine, grows in southern Mediterranean Europe from Spain to the Crimea, in Asia Minor and on Corsica/Cyprus. This pine can also be found in North Africa in the high mountains. The Austrian pine grows from sea level up to 6,600 feet and is most prevalent at the 820 – 5,200 foot level. This tree is considered to be an invasive species in New Zealand. The Austrian pine is an evergreen growing 66-180 feet tall growing as much as...

Cones of a Mountain pine, Pinus mugo
2014-02-26 09:53:40

Mountain pine (Pinus mugo) is found in the mountains of Central Europe. The mountain pine is a short, stubby, slow growing tree. The mountain pine can be found in the Alps, northern Apennines and the Balkan Peninsula mountains. The pine grows at altitudes of 3,281-7,218 feet. The mountain pine may also be found growing at 656 feet in Germany and Poland and as high as 8,858 feet in Bulgaria and in the Pyrenees. The mountain pine is also considered an invasive species and has spread in the high...

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