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2009-07-17 13:41:50

Thread-like fungi that grow in soils at high elevations may play an important role in restoring whitebark and limber pine forests in Canada. Montana State University professor Cathy Cripps is looking for ways to use fungi to help pine seedlings get a strong start. Cripps' is working with resource managers and visitor relations staff from Waterton Lakes National Park (WLNP). She is part of a project that aims to restore fire to the national park, reduce the impact of noxious weeds and restore...

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2009-07-01 16:05:00

Scientists fear that the swarms of mountain pine beetles that have killed more than half of all lodge pole pines in British Columbia may eventually make their way into forests in the US. And while cold winters typically kill most of the beetle larvae, the region has recently witnessed unusually higher temperatures that have allowed the beetle to thrive for longer periods of time. The beetle has recently been found in Alberta, and scientists told BBC News that they could threaten jack pine...

2008-12-01 17:27:00

CINCINNATI, Dec. 1 /PRNewswire/ -- PRESS OPPORTUNITY AT A GLANCE: TREE2 Longleaf Pine Seedling Planting Ceremonies Thursday, December 4 10 a.m. Gulf State Park, Gulf Shores, Alabama Thousands of new longleaf pine seedlings will be planted this week as part of an effort to restore the natural habitat along the Gulf Coast, thanks to the TREE2 outreach arranged through an Ohio-based business in partnership with educators and volunteers. Public parks and...

2008-10-07 06:00:29

By Linn Mills Here are issues that were brought up to me this past week at the Springs Preserve. Thinning pines: Pines are beautiful when they are properly thinned. This exposes their inner structure, allowing light through so you can grow ground covers and, more importantly, it cuts down on falling needles. Resist the temptation to use unskilled labor to perform the job. Instead, demand a licensed, certified, insured arborist who knows how to thin them out. These credentials also...

2008-08-01 09:00:36

By LON WAGNER By Lon Wagner The Virginian-Pilot They look like something the environmental artist Christo might have done. Elegant in their sheer starkness. Tall and narrow and white, and dead. Hundreds of pine trees, their bark now gone, stand like nature's tombstones, demanding attention just before cars pass the toll booth on the north side of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel. What happened to the trees - are they diseased, or did pests kill them? - has become the top question...

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2008-07-16 09:15:00

Amy Gannon, hatchet in hand, sliced a slab of bark from a lodgepole pine tree near Wolf Creek, Mont., and quickly spotted a mountain pine beetle larva no bigger than her pinky fingernail. "This tree's done for," said Gannon, an entomologist with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. As wildfires roar through tinder-dry forests in California, the mountain pine beetle is silently killing even more trees -- hundreds of thousands of acres of towering trees, mostly...

2008-07-16 06:00:24

By Karl Puckett Amy Gannon, hatchet in hand, sliced a slab of bark from a lodgepole pine tree near Wolf Creek, Mont., and quickly spotted a mountain pine beetle larva no bigger than her pinkie fingernail. "This tree's done for," said Gannon, an entomologist with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. As wildfires roar through tinder-dry forests in California, the mountain pine beetle is silently killing even more trees -- hundreds of thousands of acres of...

2008-06-26 06:02:33

By Cramer, John Scientists, economists, land managers and others will gather Thursday in Missoula to discuss the worsening infestation of bark beetles across the West. "Red Tree," a one-day public symposium, is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the University of Montana's University Center Ballroom. The symposium is free, but registration is required at 542-4300. Mountain pine beetles and other bark beetles have killed millions of acres of trees from Alaska to the Southwest in recent...

2008-02-20 03:00:34

By Archer, Jessica K Miller, Deborah L; Tanner, George W ARCHER, J. K. (Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611), D. L. MILLER (Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida West Florida Research and Education Center, 5988 Hwy 90, Bldg 4900, Milton, FL 32583), AND G. W. TANNER (Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611). Changes in understory vegetation and soil...

2008-01-15 13:10:00

Most of Colorado's lodgepole pine trees stand to be dead within the next 5 years.  In 1996, a bark beetle infestation was detected, and last year it spread over 500,000 acres more than previous years. Federal forestry officials say that this brings the total count of affected acres to 1.5 million. This infestation mainly affects five northern counties which straddle the Continental Divide, and has recently spread to part of southern Wyoming and the Front Range. Those effected counties...


Latest Pine Reference Libraries

Virginia Pine, Pinus virginiana, pollen cones
2014-05-19 09:44:09

Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) grows in southern New York from Long Island and continues through the Appalachian Mountains to western Tennessee and Alabamain elevations as high as 2953 feet. This tree is also known as the scrub pine, spruce pine, or Jersey pine. The Harvard Arboretum in Boston, MA has cultivated Virginia pine on display. The Virginia pine is a medium sized tree growing from 29.5 – 59 feet tall with some getting as tall as 105 feet in perfect conditions. This tree grows...

Torrey Pine, Pinus torreyana
2014-05-19 09:27:13

Torrey pine (Pinus torreyana) is found only in California in the county of San Diego with one of the Channel Islands. This pine is the rarest and is considered endangered with only about 7000 trees in San Diego and 2000 left on the island of Santa Rosa. The Torrey pine grows from 200-500 feet above sea level and grows to heights of 26-49 feet tall with trunk diameters between one and two feet. The trunk of this tree can be straight, crooked, and often leaning due to the prevailing winds....

Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa
2014-05-16 11:05:52

Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is native to western North America in sixteen states as well as southern British Columbia, Canada. This tree is also known as the bull pine, blackjack pine, or western pitch, red and yellow pine, as well as Yosemite pine. The Ponderosa pine grows at sea level up to 9843 feet above sea level and can live 300-600 years. This pine is one of the largest pine trees growing to heights of 235 feet and can achieve a trunk diameter of 324 inches. The bark of mature...

Pond Pine, Pinus serotina
2014-05-16 10:40:26

Pond Pine (Pinus serotina) grows in the United States along the Atlantic coast from southern New Jersey south to Florida then west to southern Alabama. This pine grows in wet ground near ponds, and swamps and is also known as the marsh pine or pocosin pine. The pond pine is a small tree growing to heights of 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet. The tree tends to grow crooked and has several tops at the crown. The bark is scaly and reddish brown in color. The needles grow in bundles...

Pitch Pine, Pinus rigida
2014-05-16 10:12:06

Pitch pine (Pinus rigida) is native to the northeastern United States from Maine to northern Georgia and west to Ohio and Kentucky with a few found in Quebec and Ontario, Canada. This pine can be found growing in coastal areas as it is somewhat salt resistant. The Pitch pine grows from sea level up to 8038 feet above sea level. This tree grows in all types of soil from acidic sandy soils to the gravelly soils, and from the driest of areas to the wettest. This tree is a small to medium...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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