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Latest Pine Stories

2008-10-07 06:00:29

By Linn Mills Here are issues that were brought up to me this past week at the Springs Preserve. Thinning pines: Pines are beautiful when they are properly thinned. This exposes their inner structure, allowing light through so you can grow ground covers and, more importantly, it cuts down on falling needles. Resist the temptation to use unskilled labor to perform the job. Instead, demand a licensed, certified, insured arborist who knows how to thin them out. These credentials also...

2008-08-01 09:00:36

By LON WAGNER By Lon Wagner The Virginian-Pilot They look like something the environmental artist Christo might have done. Elegant in their sheer starkness. Tall and narrow and white, and dead. Hundreds of pine trees, their bark now gone, stand like nature's tombstones, demanding attention just before cars pass the toll booth on the north side of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel. What happened to the trees - are they diseased, or did pests kill them? - has become the top question...

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2008-07-16 09:15:00

Amy Gannon, hatchet in hand, sliced a slab of bark from a lodgepole pine tree near Wolf Creek, Mont., and quickly spotted a mountain pine beetle larva no bigger than her pinky fingernail. "This tree's done for," said Gannon, an entomologist with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. As wildfires roar through tinder-dry forests in California, the mountain pine beetle is silently killing even more trees -- hundreds of thousands of acres of towering trees, mostly...

2008-07-16 06:00:24

By Karl Puckett Amy Gannon, hatchet in hand, sliced a slab of bark from a lodgepole pine tree near Wolf Creek, Mont., and quickly spotted a mountain pine beetle larva no bigger than her pinkie fingernail. "This tree's done for," said Gannon, an entomologist with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. As wildfires roar through tinder-dry forests in California, the mountain pine beetle is silently killing even more trees -- hundreds of thousands of acres of...

2008-06-26 06:02:33

By Cramer, John Scientists, economists, land managers and others will gather Thursday in Missoula to discuss the worsening infestation of bark beetles across the West. "Red Tree," a one-day public symposium, is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the University of Montana's University Center Ballroom. The symposium is free, but registration is required at 542-4300. Mountain pine beetles and other bark beetles have killed millions of acres of trees from Alaska to the Southwest in recent...

2008-02-20 03:00:34

By Archer, Jessica K Miller, Deborah L; Tanner, George W ARCHER, J. K. (Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611), D. L. MILLER (Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida West Florida Research and Education Center, 5988 Hwy 90, Bldg 4900, Milton, FL 32583), AND G. W. TANNER (Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611). Changes in understory vegetation and soil...

2008-01-15 13:10:00

Most of Colorado's lodgepole pine trees stand to be dead within the next 5 years.  In 1996, a bark beetle infestation was detected, and last year it spread over 500,000 acres more than previous years. Federal forestry officials say that this brings the total count of affected acres to 1.5 million. This infestation mainly affects five northern counties which straddle the Continental Divide, and has recently spread to part of southern Wyoming and the Front Range. Those effected counties...

2006-11-13 15:00:40

BOSTON, Nov. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Christmas just isn't Christmas without a freshly-cut tree, meticulously decorated and lights aglow, with presents laid out below and the fragrance of fresh pine needles in the air. Along with a "real" Christmas tree comes the hassle of keeping it watered -- crawling on hands and knees underneath the tree with a pitcher or watering can, spilling water all over the floor and the carefully wrapped gifts, and getting poked in the eye by pine needles. If only there...

2006-01-17 07:37:45

GRANGEVILLE, Idaho -- Northwest loggers are worried British Columbia may be forced to harvest as much as 21 million acres of forests to stop the mountain pine beetle, flooding the market and driving down timber prices. The infected forests in British Columbia make up an area roughly 40 percent the size of Idaho. To combat the beetles, the province is increasing allowable timber cuts 78 percent; big trouble for mills throughout the Northwest. "They're going to bury us in the sand," said Dick...

2005-09-01 23:50:00

Biologists studying a lethal blight of lodgepole pines in northwestern British Columbia present strong evidence in the September issue of BioScience that climate change is to blame for the outbreak. The blight, caused by the fungus Dothistroma septosporum, causes trees to lose their needles and, in the case of the British Columbia outbreak, eventually die. D. septosporum has long been recognized as a pathogen of pines, but although it is considered a serious disease of exotic plantations in...


Latest Pine Reference Libraries

Hartweg’s Pine, Pinus hartwegii
2014-04-22 13:27:36

Hartweg’s pine (Pinus hartwegii) is found growing in the mountains of  Mexico and Central America east to Honduras. This tree was discovered and named in 1838 by Karl Hartweg. The Hartweg’s pine is related to the Pinus Montezuma species which has shorter needles, as well as smaller cones and grows at lower altitudes. The Hartweg Pine grows at altitudes of 8200-14100 feet above sea level forming the alpine tree line in the higher mountains of Mexico. This pine tolerates dry winters,...

Gregg’s Pine, Pinus greggii
2014-04-22 13:05:16

Gregg’s pine (Pinus greggii) is native to eastern Mexico. The name is derived from a merchant, explorer, naturalist, and author of the American Southwest and Northern Mexico, Josiah Gregg (1806-1850). This pine is closely related to the Patula pine with the difference being in the length of the needles and the bark of the tree. The Gregg’s pine grows at altitudes between 4265 – 8530 feet in the highlands region while in the northern part of its region it grows at altitudes of...

Gray Pine, Pinus sabiniana
2014-04-22 11:07:33

Gray pine (Pinus sabiniana) is prevalent throughout California in the United States. The tree is also known as the Digger pine, California foothill pine, ghost pine, bull pine, and nut pine. The Gray pine grows from sea level to 4,000 feet above sea level. This pine likes 15-25 inches of rain per year and grows best in rocky, well-drained soils. This pine is a short pine growing to heights of 36-45 feet high, 105 feet in ideal growing conditions, with trunks measuring 23.6-47.2 inches in...

Coulter Pine, Pinus coulteri, cones
2014-04-22 10:39:35

Coulter pine (Pinus coulteri) is native to the coastal mountains of Southern California and northern Mexico. Rare, isolated stands of Coulter pine can be found in the San Francisco Bay Area. This tree is also known as the big cone pine and was named after an Irish botanist and physician, Thomas Coulter. The Coulter pine grows in sunny, dry, rocky soil at elevations of 600-7500 feet above sea level. This tree is a medium sized tree with heights of 30-80 feet and a three-foot trunk...

Needles and cones, Bishop Pine, Pinus muricata
2014-04-18 10:20:50

Bishop pine (Pinus muricata) grows on or near the coast in California and Mexico; becoming endangered in Mexico. This tree also goes by the name of prickle cone pine, bull pine, Obispo pine, Santa Cruz pine and dwarf marine pine. This pine relies on the dense fog from the coast for its water supply as well as rainwater. This pine is also highly dependent on forest fires for future regeneration and may become extinct with the prevention of forest fires in its region. The Bishop pine grows...

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