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Latest Pinniped Stories

Elephant Seal Travels 18,000 Miles: WCS
2011-12-14 04:06:35

The Wildlife Conservation Society tracked a southern elephant seal for an astonishing 18,000 miles — the equivalent of New York to Sydney and back again. WCS tracked the male seal from December, 2010, to November, 2011. The animal — nicknamed Jackson — was tagged on the beach in Admiralty Sound in Tierra del Fuego in southern Chile. WCS conservationists fitted Jackson with a small satellite transmitter that recorded his exact location when he surfaced to breathe....

Parenting Styles Among Seals Differ
2011-11-23 04:20:53

Grey seals have different types of personality that affect the extent to which they guard and care for their young, according to new research. Researchers from Durham University and the University of St Andrews, looking at seal colonies in Scotland, found that seal mothers are often unpredictable and adopt a wide variation of mothering styles when it comes to checking on their pups. Some are very attentive while others are not, the researchers found. The Durham-St Andrews study shows,...

2011-06-09 13:44:00

YARMOUTH PORT, Mass., June 9, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Great white sharks may not be the only predators local gray seals are facing this summer. Over the last six weeks, five adult gray seals were found shot on Cape Cod beaches from Dennis to Chatham. Biologists from the International Fund for Animal Welfare's (IFAW - www.ifaw.org) Marine Mammal Rescue and Research team discovered the cases in the course of standard stranding response efforts. Given the large population of gray...

2011-06-01 10:27:00

WASHINGTON, June 1, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The following is being issued by Doctor Patient Medical Association: DATE: Saturday, June 4, 2011 TIME: 8 am till finish PLACE: Nationwide (donations accepted online) The public is invited to match their fitness with Navy SEALS in the 3rd Annual Navy SEAL Memorial Challenge on Saturday, June 4 in gyms across the country. Dubbed " Murph Day 2011" in honor of fallen SEAL and Medal of Honor recipient, Lt. Michael...

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2011-05-12 09:50:00

A study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology shows that seals can detect the size and shape of objects by sensing differences in the trail of disturbance they make in the water and use this ability to identify the best fish, BBC News is reporting. Dr. Wolf Hanke and scientists from the Marine Science Center at the University of Rostock, Germany, first showed how sensitive seals' whiskers were last year when they reported that a trained seal named Henry was able to sense an...

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2011-03-31 08:25:00

NOAA's Fisheries Service scientists studying the cooperative hunting behavior of killer whales in Antarctic waters observed the animals favoring one type of seal over all other available food sources, according to a study published in the journal Marine Mammal Science. Researchers Robert Pitman and John Durban from NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, Calif., observed killer whales hunting in ice floes, off the western Antarctic Peninsula during January of 2009. While...


Latest Pinniped Reference Libraries

Japanese Sea Lion, Zalophus japonicas
2013-06-22 16:34:14

The Japanese sea lion (Zalophus japonicas) is in extinct species that could once be found in the Sea of Japan. The biggest populations occurred around the Korean peninsula and the Japanese Archipelago. In these areas, both sea lions and seals have influenced the names of some coastal areas, like Inubosaki or “dog-barking point.” It was formally classified as a distinct species in 2003 due to a difference in behaviors and range, but was previously known as a subspecies of the California...

Japanese Sea Lion, Zalophus japonicas
2013-06-10 11:01:20

The Japanese sea lion (Zalophus japonicas) is in extinct species that could once be found in the Sea of Japan. The biggest populations occurred around the Korean peninsula and the Japanese Archipelago. In these areas, both sea lions and seals have influenced the names of some coastal areas, like Inubosaki or “dog-barking point.” It was formally classified as a distinct species in 2003 due to a difference in behaviors and range, but was previously known as a subspecies of the California...

Harp Seal
2013-05-01 15:08:34

The harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus), also known as the saddleback seal, is a true seal in the Phocidae family. It is native to northern areas of the Atlantic Ocean and to some areas of the Arctic Ocean. Its scientific name means "ice-lover from Greenland,” and it was previously classified within Phoca genus, although studies have shown that it is unique enough to be in a distinct genus. It holds two recognized subspecies, P. groenlandicus groenlandicus and P. groenlandicus oceanicus....

Ringed Seal
2013-05-01 12:51:20

The ringed seal (Pusa hispida), also known as the jar seal, is a true seal in the Phocidae family. Locally, it is known as nattiq or netsik in the Inuit language. It can be found in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions, with a range that includes the Bering and Oshtok Seas, the Arctic Ocean, and the coastlines of Japan in the north Pacific. It also occurs in the North Atlantic on the coastlines of Scandinavia, Greenland, and Newfoundland.  Within its range, the ringed seal prefers areas with ice...

Caspian Seal
2013-04-30 14:10:47

The Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) is one of the smallest species in the true seal family that is native only to the Caspian Sea.  It can be seen on shorelines, rocky islands, and ice blocks that occur throughout the sea. In warmer months, these seals will inhabit northern areas of this range, but in colder months, they inhabit cooler waters and the mouths of the Ural and Volga rivers. It is thought that these seals only occur in the Caspian Sea because they moved there during the Quaternary...

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Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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