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Latest Pinophyta Stories

83a065e7122a579ee18b6de2b7d9a2d91
2010-03-23 09:30:05

New research confirms that early angiosperms were weedy, fast-growing Fossils and their surrounding matrix can provide insights into what our world looked like millions of years ago. Fossils of angiosperms, or flowering plants (which are the most common plants today), first appear in the fossil record about 140 million years ago. Based on the material in which these fossils are deposited, it is thought that early angiosperms must have been weedy, fast-growing shrubs and herbs found in highly...

90a0e238ccce4fb1fe19f85141d426a0
2009-11-11 07:40:12

How revising an ancient species can change what we know of a lineage's historical distribution and the climate in which it lived Fossil plants are windows to the past, providing us with clues as to what our planet looked like millions of years ago. Not only do fossils tell us which species were present before human-recorded history, but they can provide information about the climate and how and when lineages may have dispersed around the world. Identifying fossil plants can be tricky,...

2009-09-03 09:51:20

Flowering plants are all around us and are phenomenally successful"”but how did they get to be so successful and where did they come from? This question bothered Darwin and others and a paper published in the September issue of the Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society indicates that their ability to adapt anatomically may be the answer. Sherwin Carlquist, a research botanist at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden and recipient of the Linnean Medal for Botany, has spent his career...

2008-08-18 12:00:28

By Ben Sutherly Staff Writer MIAMI TWP., Montgomery County -- In March, Rick Stanforth noticed the upper limb of a pine showing signs of stress at Cox Arboretum MetroPark. By May, more limbs were dying and on Aug. 7, workers cut the pine down. It was one of 30 droughtstressed trees to die in the past two years at the park. Last summer, the Miami Valley was in the midst of near-drought conditions and the damage is revealing itself this summer. Stanforth, the new park manager, said he...

2008-06-20 09:00:17

By Carol O'Meara Stand in their presence and it seems they anchor the world, their branches heavy in green yet light with air. Coddling is not for them; they prefer independence, and shrug off the care their deciduous companions demand. From spruces to ponderosas, firs to bristlecones, conifers form the backdrop of our gardens, and Colorado loves them. Bring them into your landscape and give them the tough spots - they'll be happy with the challenge. "The beauty of conifers is that there...

1003ffeb925291cd4b6739c8eb285a511
2005-12-23 00:30:00

Conifers such as Christmas trees suffer a severe plumbing problem. The "pipes" that carry water through firs, pines and other conifers are 10 times shorter than those in flowering trees. But a University of Utah study suggests why conifers not only survive but thrive: efficient microscopic valves let water flow through conifers about as easily as it flows through other trees. "When you are sitting around and admiring your Christmas tree, consider that it owes its existence in part to this...

2005-08-11 19:30:00

MONTREAL -- A Duke University study has found that maturing stands of pines exposed to the higher levels of carbon dioxide expected by mid-century produce more needles than those absorbing today's levels of the gas, even under drought conditions. However, the study also found that lack of soil nutrients may impose limitations in many forests. Duke graduate student Heather McCarthy will describe results she obtained from a futuristic open-air experimental forest site at 8 a.m. Eastern Time on...


Latest Pinophyta Reference Libraries

34_a3601abeb99584b617a9132dad42ffdb
2005-06-14 09:03:05

The Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) is a large passerine bird in the family Corvidae. It is slightly smaller than its Eurasian relative, Spotted Nutcracker (N. caryocatactes). It is ashy-grey all over except for the black-and-white wings and central tail feathers (the outer ones are white). The bill, legs and feet are also black. This bird is found in western North America from British Columbia and western Alberta in the north to Baja California and western New Mexico in the...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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