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Latest Pinus Stories

Noise Pollution Has Effect On Plants, Study Finds
2012-03-23 06:50:06

A new study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B has found that human noise like traffic can have ripple effects on plants. Lead author Clinton Francis of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) in Durham, North Carolina, said the consequences of noise could last for decades, even after the source of the noise goes away. Previous studies found that some animals increase in numbers near noisy sites, while others decline, but the results of the new study found...

2012-03-15 16:45:55

A new study of the composition of pine nuts, including those associated with "pine mouth," leaves unsolved the decade-old mystery of why thousands of people around the world have experienced disturbances in taste after eating pine nuts. The report on pine nuts or pignolia – delicious edible nuts from pine trees enjoyed plain or added to foods ranging from pasta to cookies – appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. Ali Reza Fardin-Kia, Sara M. Handy and...

2011-12-14 09:45:00

WASHINGTON, Dec. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Building on nearly a decade of investment to restore vanishing longleaf pine forests in the southeastern United States, NFWF (the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation) has established the Longleaf Stewardship Fund, a landmark public-private partnership that includes the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Natural Resources Conservation Service and Southern Company. With the...

2011-11-04 12:49:23

A huge "migration" of trees has begun across much of the West due to global warming, insect attack, diseases and fire, and many tree species are projected to decline or die out in regions where they have been present for centuries, while others move in and replace them. In an enormous display of survival of the fittest, the forests of the future are taking a new shape. In a new report, scientists outline the impact that a changing climate will have on which tree species can survive, and...

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2011-06-10 09:59:08

Researchers see increase in snowpack under bare dead pine trees, earlier melt under dead trees with red needles A new University of Colorado Boulder study indicates the infestation of trees by mountain pine beetles in the high country across the West could potentially trigger earlier snowmelt and increase water yields from snowpack that accumulates beneath affected trees. Led by CU-Boulder geological sciences department doctoral student Evan Pugh, the study was undertaken near Grand Lake,...

2011-04-19 14:06:48

Neiker-Tecnalia (the Basque Institute for Agricultural Research and Development) is working on the development of new biotechnological tools to produce in vitro selected trees of the Pinus genus. Scientists at this technological centre have developed various techniques for propagation of Pinus radiata, Pinus pinea, Pinus pinaster and Pinus sylvestris by using tissue culture. These methodologies enable obtaining a great quantity of clonal material, which can be used both in genetic improve...

2011-04-04 20:11:09

A University of Alberta-led research team has determined that the mountain pine beetle has invaded jack pine forests in Alberta, opening up the possibility for an infestation that could stretch across the Prairies and keep moving east towards the Atlantic. A group of U of A tree biologists and geneticists discovered that, as the mountain pine beetle spread eastward from central British Columbia, it successfully jumped species from its main host, the lodgepole pine, to the jack pine. Jack pine...

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2011-02-28 11:39:18

Lodgepole pine, a hardy tree species that can thrive in cold temperatures and plays a key role in many western ecosystems, is already shrinking in range as a result of climate change "“ and may almost disappear from most of the Pacific Northwest by 2080, a new study concludes. Including Canada, where it is actually projected to increase in some places, lodgepole pine is expected to be able to survive in only 17 percent of its current range in the western parts of North America. The...

2011-02-17 12:55:41

New study of Clark's nutcrackers suggests that their caching of whitebark pine seeds is less effective than previously thought at restoring populations of the declining conifer The caching of whitebark pine seeds by the Clark's nutcracker in late summer and early fall may not be enough to regenerate populations of the imperiled conifer in most of its range, scientists have found. Their research"”which is featured in the February issue of Science Findings, a monthly publication of the...

2011-01-24 18:33:56

The genome of the fungus that helps mountain pine beetles infect and kill lodgepole pines has been decoded in a University of British Columbia study. Also known as blue stain fungus for the stain it leaves in the wood of infected trees, Grosmannia clavigera is carried to the host trees by pine beetles and weakens the trees' natural defense system, allowing pine beetles to feed and reproduce in the tree bark. A successful beetle-fungus attack ultimately causes tree death. Now, researchers from...


Latest Pinus Reference Libraries

Hartweg’s Pine, Pinus hartwegii
2014-04-22 13:27:36

Hartweg’s pine (Pinus hartwegii) is found growing in the mountains of  Mexico and Central America east to Honduras. This tree was discovered and named in 1838 by Karl Hartweg. The Hartweg’s pine is related to the Pinus Montezuma species which has shorter needles, as well as smaller cones and grows at lower altitudes. The Hartweg Pine grows at altitudes of 8200-14100 feet above sea level forming the alpine tree line in the higher mountains of Mexico. This pine tolerates dry winters,...

Gregg’s Pine, Pinus greggii
2014-04-22 13:05:16

Gregg’s pine (Pinus greggii) is native to eastern Mexico. The name is derived from a merchant, explorer, naturalist, and author of the American Southwest and Northern Mexico, Josiah Gregg (1806-1850). This pine is closely related to the Patula pine with the difference being in the length of the needles and the bark of the tree. The Gregg’s pine grows at altitudes between 4265 – 8530 feet in the highlands region while in the northern part of its region it grows at altitudes of...

Gray Pine, Pinus sabiniana
2014-04-22 11:07:33

Gray pine (Pinus sabiniana) is prevalent throughout California in the United States. The tree is also known as the Digger pine, California foothill pine, ghost pine, bull pine, and nut pine. The Gray pine grows from sea level to 4,000 feet above sea level. This pine likes 15-25 inches of rain per year and grows best in rocky, well-drained soils. This pine is a short pine growing to heights of 36-45 feet high, 105 feet in ideal growing conditions, with trunks measuring 23.6-47.2 inches in...

Coulter Pine, Pinus coulteri, cones
2014-04-22 10:39:35

Coulter pine (Pinus coulteri) is native to the coastal mountains of Southern California and northern Mexico. Rare, isolated stands of Coulter pine can be found in the San Francisco Bay Area. This tree is also known as the big cone pine and was named after an Irish botanist and physician, Thomas Coulter. The Coulter pine grows in sunny, dry, rocky soil at elevations of 600-7500 feet above sea level. This tree is a medium sized tree with heights of 30-80 feet and a three-foot trunk...

Needles and cones, Bishop Pine, Pinus muricata
2014-04-18 10:20:50

Bishop pine (Pinus muricata) grows on or near the coast in California and Mexico; becoming endangered in Mexico. This tree also goes by the name of prickle cone pine, bull pine, Obispo pine, Santa Cruz pine and dwarf marine pine. This pine relies on the dense fog from the coast for its water supply as well as rainwater. This pine is also highly dependent on forest fires for future regeneration and may become extinct with the prevention of forest fires in its region. The Bishop pine grows...

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