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Latest Pisaster Stories

Mysterious Wasting Virus Killing Starfish Along West Coast
2013-11-04 15:04:27

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online California marine biologists are reporting the spread of a mysterious bacteria that is killing starfish up and down the West Coast – transforming the echinoderms into piles of goo in the process. “They essentially melt in front of you,” Pete Raimondi, a biologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz, told The Santa Rosa Press Democrat. The affected animals form white lesions on their exterior that grow and occasionally...

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2009-10-28 13:10:00

Scientists have discovered that one species of starfish has a remarkable strategy to avoid overheating in the sun, BBC News reported. Experts say the ochre starfish or sea star (Pisaster ochraceus) pumps itself up with cold seawater to lower its body temperature when exposed to the sun at low tide, something scientists say is equivalent to a person drinking seven liters of water before heading into the midday sun. But the researchers warn that global climate change may drastically interfere...

2009-06-03 16:49:13

Canadian zoologists have determined elevated water temperatures and high carbon dioxide concentrations can boost the growth of a species of sea star. The University of British Columbia scientists said their study is one of the first to look at the impact of ocean acidification on marine invertebrates that don't have a large calcified skeleton or external shell. The researchers said their findings challenge current assumptions about the potential impact of climate change on marine species. The...

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2009-06-01 11:18:33

New research by UBC zoologists indicates that elevated water temperatures and heightened concentrations of carbon dioxide can dramatically increase the growth rate of a keystone species of sea star. The study is one of the first to look at the impact of ocean acidification on marine invertebrates that don't have a large calcified skeleton or external shell, and challenges current assumptions about the potential impact of climate change on marine species. The findings were published online...


Latest Pisaster Reference Libraries

Ochre Sea Star, Pisaster ochraceus
2013-08-11 13:34:24

The ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus), also known as the ochre starfish or the purple sea star, is a species of starfish that is classified within the Asteriidae family. This species can be found in the Pacific Ocean in a range that extends from Santa Barbara Co., California to Prince William Sound in Alaska. This species holds one subspecies, known as Pisaster ochraceus segnis, which can be found in warmer waters that the ochre sea star. Adult individuals prefer a habit in rocky areas at...

Giant Sea Star, Pisaster giganteus
2013-08-09 10:08:32

The giant sea star (Pisaster giganteus) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Asteriidae family. It can be found along the western coasts of North America, with a range that extends from British Columbia to southern California. It resides in areas with low tides, where sand contains abundant substrate to which the starfish can cling. The giant sea star is broad and holds wide arms, reaching between 14.1 and 18.8 inches from arm to arm. Like other starfish species, this sea...

Pink Sea Star, Pisaster brevispinus
2013-08-09 10:05:29

The pink sea star (Pisaster brevispinus), also known as the short-spined sea star or the giant pink sea star, is a species of starfish that is classified within the Asteriidae family that can be found in the Pacific Ocean. It prefers to reside in muddy or sandy areas at depths of up to 590 feet, although smaller individuals can be found in rocky areas. This species was made famous by the show Spongebob Squarepants, where the main character’s best friend is a pink sea star. The pink sea...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.