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Latest Pivotal response therapy Stories

Autistic Kids Brain Voices Not Connected To Reward Center
2013-06-18 09:08:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Regions of the brain tailored to respond to human voices are poorly connected to reward-processing circuits in autistic persons, according to a new study led by Stanford University School of Medicine. These findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could help to explain why children with autism struggle to grasp the social and emotional aspects of human speech. "Weak brain connectivity may impede...

UCSB Researchers Develop New Treatment For Infants With Autism
2013-04-30 18:02:32

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online For most babies, a game of peek-a-boo can be fun, entertaining and full of laughter. However, infants with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may find the game unpleasant and disturbing. That type of social disconnect is a telltale sign of ASD, which often worsens as newborns develop into children and adults. New research from the Koegel Autism Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara has found switching games that...

Autistic Children Benefit From Early Intervention Methods
2012-11-07 08:15:41

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from Yale School of Medicine recently discovered that, when provided earlier treatment, children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) showed serious improvements in behavior, communication and brain function. Dr. Fred Volkmar, Kevin A. Pelphrey, and other researchers at the Yale Child Study Center published the study on early treatment, paving a way for brain change in autistic children. The findings were discussed...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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