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Latest Placoderms Stories

2009-07-13 13:26:42

The mode of reproduction seen in modern sharks is nearly 400 million years old. That is the conclusion drawn by Professor Per Erik Ahlberg, Uppsala University, from his discovery of a so-called "clasper" in a primitive fossil fish earlier this year. The research results are published today in Nature.In February this year, a paper published in Nature by a team of Australian and British researchers showed that placoderms, a group of ancient fishes that died out more than 350 million years ago,...

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2009-02-25 18:00:00

New research published Wednesday shows that sex has been around for much longer than many scientists had previously believed, with internal fertilization prevalent among prehistoric fish living on tropical reefs during the Devonian period 380 million years ago.The study reveals new insight on the reproductive history of all jawed vertebrates, including humans."It shifts how we think about how reproduction evolved. You're a jawed vertebrate and I'm a jawed vertebrate, so this is our own...

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2008-05-29 08:45:00

Scientists in Australia reported Thursday they had discovered the remains of the oldest vertebrate mother ever found. The fossilized 375-million-year-old placoderm fish, preserved with an embryo still attached with an umbilical cord, was found in the Gogo area of northwest Australia.      The fossil fish is the oldest-known example of a mother giving birth to live young, and pushes back the emergence of this reproductive technique by some 200 million...

2006-11-29 15:01:20

By Jeremy Manier, Chicago Tribune Nov. 29--A fearsome mega-predator of the ancient seas had the most powerful jaws of any fish that ever lived, according to a new study that makes even the biggest great white shark seem like a slack-jawed weakling. The new report by scientists at the Field Museum and the University of Chicago offers a unique window into the bizarre aquatic world of 400 million years ago, when the conquest of dry land by animals had barely begun and the first jawed...

2006-11-29 09:00:00

U.S. scientists have determined a prehistoric sea monster had the most powerful bite of any creature yet known: up to 80,000 pounds per square inch. Scientists have known for years the fish -- Dunkleosteus terrelli -- was a dominant predator about 400 million years ago. But new research indicates some incredible information about the fish, including the fact it could bring its fangs together with a force of nearly 11,000 pounds -- that's nearly four times more power than a Tyrannosaurus rex....

2006-11-28 21:00:17

CHICAGO _ A fearsome mega-predator of the ancient seas had the most powerful jaws of any fish that ever lived, according to a new study that makes even the biggest great white shark seem like a slack-jawed weakling. The new report by scientists at the Field Museum and the University of Chicago offers a unique window into the bizarre aquatic world of 400 million years ago, when the conquest of dry land by animals had barely begun and the first jawed creatures were carving out their...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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